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American PHOTOAmerican PHOTO

American PHOTO

March - April 2015

American PHOTO is the premier showcase for outstanding photography. A reflection of contemporary culture through the camera's lens, it inspires professionals and sophisticated amateurs alike with its coverage of art, fashion, journalism celebrity, sports, politics and advertising. American PHOTO is a stunning visual commentary on our world, featuring masters of photography among others. Each issue also includes technical data on the featured images as well as the behind-the-scenes anecdotes that relate to the shot.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bonnier Corporation
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IN THIS ISSUE

access_time5 min.
double vision

ONE TO WATCH To simply describe Justin Fantl’s imagery as clean, geometric, or playful—adjectives he often hears—would be accurate enough, says the Los Angeles–based photographer. Yet to do so might box his work into a single aesthetic—a proposition he rejects. In Fantl’s view, constructed still lifes and natural vistas mingle. His graphically charged indoor images incorporate candy-colored geometric planes whose clean lines and vibrant hues bring inanimate objects to life. His grand outdoor landscapes are carefully composed to appear as if just discovered. Fantl thrives on the balance between chance and control. He traces the start of his career path to a “serendipitous” encounter, he says, with a photographer, “the coolest cool guy I had ever met, with the coolest job I had ever heard of” while traveling on a bus in…

access_time5 min.
on the edge

In early 2007, a 24-year-old Bryan Derballa arrived in New York City with little cash and big ideas. “I few into La Guardia with two suitcases, a skateboard, and a backpack, and I took a bus and subway from the airport,” he recalls. “On the stairs I’d take one heavy bag, then go back and get the other one, doing these shuttles every 20 feet. Finally this 6-foot-2 Puerto Rican transgender gal came up and said, ‘Honey, you look like you need some help!’ She got me to my friends’ house where I was staying. It was a great welcome to New York.” Thus kicked off the latest of Derballa’s grand adventures. At age 18 he trekked from his hometown of Asheville, North Carolina, to the University of California at Berkeley…

access_time9 min.
without a net

My name is Rachel Sussman. I live in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. I am a contemporary artist. That’s what I do for a living—no day job, just what sometimes feels like a 24-hour on-call job. Of art. Of arting. Back in 2004 I took a trip to Japan. I had just finished an artist residency at the Cooper Union, and I had just purchased a new camera (a Mamiya 7ii, which would accompany me around the world and which I still shoot with). I went there without an agenda other than to continue making photographs about the relationship between humanity and nature. I ended up having this incredible adventure to a remote island where, I was told, there was a 7,000-year-old tree. Once you got to the island, it was a two-day…

access_time2 min.
play on

Of the many mysteries in photography culture, one question seized my attention recently: Why are so many photographers really into music, and conversely so many musicians really into photography? For an answer I called my friend Jeff Dunas, probably the most plugged-in photographer I’ve ever met. His collection of gorgeous musician portraits, State of the Blues, was published by Aperture in 2005. “Music and photography go hand in hand,” he said. “A third component is actually red wine.” After we stopped laughing, he continued: “We photographers create the visual aspect of the music, so we’re playing a pivotal role.” It’s true: Photographers are directly responsible for the rock iconography of the past halfcentury, and many of those shooters still live off their archives. Now that well is largely dry, in part because…

access_time5 min.
the goods

RESOLUTION RACE TO THE TOP Canon EOS 5Ds and 5DsR With these two entries to its popular EOS 5D line, Canon promises the highest pixel count of any full-frame (35mm-format) CMOS sensor—50.6 megapixels. Due to hit shelves in June, both are aimed at landscape photographers, commercial pros, and artists who plan to print on a large scale. Aside from the 5DsR’s low-pass filter cancellation feature, the cameras are identical. Each uses a pair of Canon’s fastest image processors: the Digic 6, to handle all that data. They take UHS-1 class memory cards, and a small RAW setting captures 12.4MB files when the full resolution is too much of a good thing. The cameras also add one-step mirror lockup that can be programmed for up to a two-second delay for critical stillness. BUY IT…

access_time7 min.
in the bag

“I ’m a music fan,” says photographer Ian Witlen. As a kid wading into the crowd at punk and pop-punk shows with a camera in his hand, “never in a million years did I think I’d have the chance to work in the business.” Yet that’s how this South Florida–based pro (thecameraclicks.com), whose background is in photojournalism, makes his living now—not just with editorial portraits but with arresting in-yourface images that capture the visceral energy of live acts in venues from tiny clubs to big outdoor festivals. And, like many other pros, he also still shoots for his own pleasure, as a fan. That distinction is important, because professional photographers, when they’re on assignment (and sometimes when off duty), get access and opportunities at live shows that the audience does not.…

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