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category_outlined / Tech & Gaming
AppleMagazineAppleMagazine

AppleMagazine #325

AppleMagazine is a weekly publication packed with news, iTunes and Apps reviews, interviews and original articles on anything and everything Apple. AppleMagazine brings a new concept of light, intelligent, innovative reading to your fingertips; with a global view of Apple and its influence on our lives - be it leisure activities, family or work-collaborative projects. Elegantly designed and highly interactive, AppleMagazine will also keep you updated on the latest weekly news. It's that simple! It’s all about Apple and its worldwide culture influence, all in one place, and only one tap away. Get AppleMagazine digital subscription today.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Ivan Castilho de Almeida
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26 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time4 min.
quantum speed limit may put brakes on quantum computers

Over the past five decades, standard computer processors have gotten increasingly faster. In recent years, however, the limits to that technology have become clear: Chip components can only get so small, and be packed only so closely together, before they overlap or short-circuit. If companies are to continue building ever-faster computers, something will need to change.One key hope for the future of increasingly fast computing is my own field, quantum physics. Quantum computers are expected to be much faster than anything the information age has developed so far. But my recent research has revealed that quantum computers will have limits of their own – and has suggested ways to figure out what those limits are. THE LIMITS OF UNDERSTANDING To physicists, we humans live in what is…

access_time3 min.
intel underfoot: floor sensors rise as retail data source

The next phase in data collection is right under your feet.Online clicks give retailers valuable insight into consumer behavior, but what can they learn from footsteps? It’s a question Milwaukee-based startup Scanalytics is helping businesses explore with floor sensors that track people’s movements.The sensors can also be used in office buildings to reduce energy costs and in nursing homes to determine when someone falls. But retailers make up the majority of Scanalytics’ customers, highlighting one of several efforts brick-and-mortar stores are undertaking to better understand consumer habits and catch up with e-commerce giant Amazon. Physical stores have been at a disadvantage because they “don’t have that granular level of understanding as to where users are entering, what they’re doing, what shelves are not doing well, which aisles are not…

access_time1 min.
a sampling of tracking technologies for traditional stores

Brick-and-mortar retailers are using different tracking technologies to better understand their customers and keep up with e-commerce giant Amazon. Here is a sampling of the different tracking methods available to stores: FLOOR SENSORS Paper-thin tiles developed by Milwaukee-based Scanalytics measure foot compressions to analyze people’s movements over time so stores know what products displays draw customers’ attention and for how long. That allows businesses to study what sells, know when to schedule staff for busy times, and what store layout is most effective. The technology might still be too pricey for smaller retailers, however. INTELLIGENT VIDEO CAMERAS Companies such as Toronto-based Vendlytics and San Francisco-based Prism use artificial intelligence with video cameras to analyze body motions. That can allow stores to deliver customized coupons to shoppers…

access_time5 min.
what facebook’s shift could mean to users, businesses

In coming days, Facebook users will see fewer posts from publishers, businesses and celebs they follow. Instead, Facebook wants people to see more stuff from friends, family and other people they are likely to have “meaningful” conversations with — something the company laments has been lost in the sea of videos, news stories (real and fake), and viral quizzes on which “Big Bang Theory” character you are.Here are some frequently asked questions about what users and businesses might expect from the changes. WHY IS FACEBOOK DOING THIS? CEO Mark Zuckerberg has been doing a bit of soul-searching about the negative effects his company may be having on society and its users’ psyches. He’s come a long way since November 2016, when he dismissed the notion that fake news…

access_time4 min.
lifelike robots made in hong kong meant to win over humans

David Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become “super-intelligent genius machines” that might help solve some of mankind’s most challenging problems.If only it were as simple as that.The Texas-born former sculptor at Walt Disney Imagineering and his Hong Kong-based startup Hanson Robotics are combining artificial intelligence with southern China’s expertise in toy design, electronics and manufacturing to craft humanoid “social robots” with faces designed to be lifelike and appealing enough to win trust from humans who interact with them.Hanson, 49, is perhaps best known as the creator of Sophia, a talk show-going robot partly modeled on Audrey Hepburn that he calls his “masterpiece.”(Image: Denis Balibouse)Akin to an animated mannequin, she seems as much a product of his background in theatrics as an example of advanced…

access_time1 min.
click, tap, buy: holiday shoppers spent record amount online

Shoppers spent a record amount online during the holiday season.That’s according to Adobe Analytics, which reports online shopping during the holiday season reached $108.2 billion, up almost 15 percent from $94.4 billion the year before. The research arm of software maker Adobe says more than a third of online holiday revenue came from purchases made on smartphones or tablets.Adobe Analytics says people likely spent more due to low unemployment rates and a strong stock market.Last week, the National Retail Federation said in-store and online holiday spending rose 5.5. percent, the strongest gain since the Great Recession. ■…

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