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category_outlined / Tech & Gaming
AppleMagazineAppleMagazine

AppleMagazine #326

AppleMagazine is a weekly publication packed with news, iTunes and Apps reviews, interviews and original articles on anything and everything Apple. AppleMagazine brings a new concept of light, intelligent, innovative reading to your fingertips; with a global view of Apple and its influence on our lives - be it leisure activities, family or work-collaborative projects. Elegantly designed and highly interactive, AppleMagazine will also keep you updated on the latest weekly news. It's that simple! It’s all about Apple and its worldwide culture influence, all in one place, and only one tap away. Get AppleMagazine digital subscription today.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Ivan Castilho de Almeida
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26 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
apple will give users control over slowdown of older iphones

Apple’s next major update of its mobile software will include an option that will enable owners of older iPhones to turn off a feature that slows the device to prevent aging batteries from shutting down.The free upgrade announced Wednesday will be released this spring.The additional controls are meant to appease iPhone owners outraged since Apple acknowledged last month that its recent software updates had been secretly slowing down older iPhones when their batteries weakened. Many people believed Apple was purposefully undermining the performance of older iPhones to drive sales of its newer and more expensive devices. Apple insisted it was simply trying to extend the lives of older iPhones, but issued an apology last month and promised to replace batteries in affected devices at a discounted price of $50.Despite…

access_time2 min.
eu fines qualcomm for paying apple to use its microchips

The European Union slapped a $1.23 billion fine on U.S. chipmaker Qualcomm for abusing its market dominance in the lucrative sector of components in smartphones and tablets for half a decade.EU Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said that San Diego-based Qualcomm “illegally shut out rivals from the market” for more than five years by paying key customer Apple to not use chips made by Qualcomm’s rivals.Vestager said Qualcomm paid “billions of dollars” to Apple and in the process helped establish itself as the dominant force.She said the payments were made in part by reducing prices for Apple to buy Qualcomm components on condition that Apple iPhones and iPads would exclusively use Qualcomm chips.The EU said that the abuse happened between 2011 and 2016 and centered on baseband chipsets that allow smartphones…

access_time5 min.
tesla proposes big payout if musk meets lofty goals

Elon Musk is known for his bold predictions on electric and self-driving cars. Now his pay could depend on whether those predictions come true.Under a new all-or-nothing pay package, Musk would remain at Tesla Inc. for the next decade and see his compensation tied to ambitious growth targets.The proposal, revealed this week in a regulatory filing, requires that Tesla grow in $50 billion leaps, to a staggering $650 billion market capitalization.The electric car maker, based in Palo Alto, California, is worth less than $60 billion today. Tesla must hit a series of escalating revenue and adjusted profit targets, only after which Musk would vest stock options worth 1 percent of company shares. He would get no other guaranteed compensation. The pay package, developed over the last six months by…

access_time3 min.
netflix’s success turns net neutrality into an afterthought

Netflix once fought fiercely for net neutrality, fearing that its online video service would suffer if internet providers were free to discriminate against it.But now that it boasts one of television’s largest audiences, Netflix isn’t spending much time worrying about the demise of the government rules that once protected it.With millions of subscribers still flocking to its service, Netflix figures internet providers are unlikely to do anything that might alienate large numbers of their own customers who also turn to Netflix for trendy shows such as “Stranger Things,”“The Crown and “Black Mirror.” “Netflix’s fortress is so strong now that net neutrality has become background noise for them,” says GBH Insights analyst Daniel Ives. BIG AND GETTING BIGGER The Trump-era Federal Communications Commission repealed net-neutrality rules in mid-December. Those…

access_time3 min.
montana mandates ‘net neutrality’ for state contracts

Montana became the first state to bar telecommunications companies from receiving state contracts if they interfere with internet traffic or favor higher-paying sites or apps, under an order from Gov. Steve Bullock intended to protect so-called net neutrality.The Democratic governor’s order comes after the Federal Communications Commission last month repealed rules enacted in 2015 that had more tightly regulated companies such as AT&T and Verizon. Commission members said the repeal was needed to ensure the government maintains a “light touch” in its oversight of the internet. But critics such as Bullock contend change will hurt consumers and make it harder for startup companies to enter the market.“There has been a lot of talk around the country about how to respond to the recent decision,” Bullock said in announcing his…

access_time3 min.
fifa: video tech ‘definitely’ at world cup, finding sponsor

Video replays will be used at the World Cup for the first time and talks are underway with potential sponsor branding to appear when the technology is used, a FIFA executive said on Monday.Soccer’s rule-making panel met on Monday to assess recent trials ahead of video assistant referees (VAR) being officially approved by FIFA later this season for use in Russia in June and July.“Definitely, VAR will happen,” FIFA chief commercial officer Philippe Le Floc’h told The Associated Press. “It’s great to have technology in football because this is also a fair(ness) thing.” Referees were assisted for the first time by high-tech aids at a World Cup in 2014 when goal-line technology was used. That system sees a message instantly flash on referees’ watches saying only whether the ball…

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