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category_outlined / Tech & Gaming
AppleMagazineAppleMagazine

AppleMagazine #335

AppleMagazine is a weekly publication packed with news, iTunes and Apps reviews, interviews and original articles on anything and everything Apple. AppleMagazine brings a new concept of light, intelligent, innovative reading to your fingertips; with a global view of Apple and its influence on our lives - be it leisure activities, family or work-collaborative projects. Elegantly designed and highly interactive, AppleMagazine will also keep you updated on the latest weekly news. It's that simple! It’s all about Apple and its worldwide culture influence, all in one place, and only one tap away. Get AppleMagazine digital subscription today.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Ivan Castilho de Almeida
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$34.99
26 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time4 min.
new cars are quickly getting self-driving safety features

Autonomous vehicles get all the headlines, but automakers are gradually adding advanced electronic safety features to human-driven cars as they step toward a world of self-driving vehicles.Car and tech companies are rolling out laser sensors, artificial intelligence, larger viewing screens that show more of the road, cameras that can read speed limit signs, and systems that slow cars ahead of curves and construction zones. Many of the new features repurpose cameras and radar that already are in cars for automatic emergency braking, pedestrian detection and other safety devices. The companies also are keeping a closer watch on drivers to make sure they’re paying attention.On Monday, Arizona’s governor suspended Uber’s self-driving vehicle testing privileges after one of its autonomous vehicles struck and killed a pedestrian last week. But auto engineers…

access_time2 min.
mozilla, tesla, other businesses take a facebook pause

Mozilla, Tesla and other companies are distancing themselves from Facebook following revelations of a major leak of user data to political consultants associated with the 2016 Trump campaign.(Image: Lucy Nicholson)While the actions will not likely be permanent and won’t have much of an effect on Facebook’s bottom line, they’re the latest fallout the social-media giant has to contend with from the ever-spiraling scandal — along with a tumbling stock price and a #deletefacebook movement. “We’re taking a break from Facebook,” Mozilla said in a blog post. The company, which created the Firefox web browser, said it is “pressing pause” on its Facebook advertising and won’t be posting on its Facebook page. But it did not delete its page and said it will consider returning if Facebook takes stronger actions…

access_time4 min.
what facebook’s privacy policy allows may surprise you

To get an idea of the data Facebook collects about you, just ask for it. You’ll get a file with every photo and comment you’ve posted, all the ads you’ve clicked on, stuff you’ve liked and searched for and everyone you’ve friended — and unfriended — over the years.This trove of data is used to decide which ads to show you. It also makes using Facebook more seamless and enjoyable — say, by determining which posts to emphasize in your feed, or reminding you of friends’ birthdays.Facebook claims to protect all this information, and it lays out its terms in a privacy policy that’s relatively clear and concise. But few users bother to read it. You might be surprised at what Facebook’s privacy policy allows — and what’s left…

access_time10 min.
‘ready player one’ takes spielberg back & to the future

In Ernest Cline’s novel “Ready Player One,” the main character drives a DeLorean because of “Back to the Future,” and uses a grail diary because of “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.” The films of Steven Spielberg loom large in the story littered with pop culture references. That the legendary filmmaker then ended up being the one to take Cline’s futuristic-nostalgic vision to the big screen is a small Spielbergian miracle.“I hadn’t read anything that had triggered my own imagination so vividly where I couldn’t really shut it off,” said Spielberg, who, with “Ready Player One,” out Thursday, returns to the wide-eyed grand-scale blockbuster filmmaking that he made his name with. READY PLAYER ONE - Official Trailer 1 At the London premiere of new Steven Spielberg film…

access_time3 min.
watchdog: fbi could have tried harder to hack iphone

FBI officials could have tried harder to unlock an iPhone as part of a terrorism investigation before launching an extraordinary court fight with Apple Inc. in an effort to force it to break open the device, the Justice Department’s watchdog said this week.The department’s inspector general said it found no evidence the FBI was able to access data on the phone belonging to one of the gunmen in a 2015 mass shooting in San Bernardino, California, as then-FBI Director James Comey told Congress more than once. But communications failures among FBI officials delayed the search for a solution. The FBI unit tasked with breaking into mobile devices only sought outside help to unlock the phone the day before the Justice Department filed a court brief demanding Apple’s help, the…

access_time7 min.
apple event education: new ipad & all the news from the stage

As Tim Cook took center stage for Apple’sfirst event of the year , he began to lead a discussion on education, saying “At Apple, we care deeply about education because we love kids and we love teachers.” Cook stated that education has been a huge part of Apple’s identity for 40 years, explaining “We had a unique insight into how technology could inspire kids to unleash their creative genius. And we believed that technology could help teachers deliver a unique and personalized learning experience to all kids. We’ve never stopped believing this, and we’ve never stopped working on it.” (Image: John Gress) Taking it out of California to host at a high school in Chicago, Apple promised to focus its latest products toward an education market…

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