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category_outlined / Tech & Gaming
AppleMagazineAppleMagazine

AppleMagazine #320

AppleMagazine is a weekly publication packed with news, iTunes and Apps reviews, interviews and original articles on anything and everything Apple. AppleMagazine brings a new concept of light, intelligent, innovative reading to your fingertips; with a global view of Apple and its influence on our lives - be it leisure activities, family or work-collaborative projects. Elegantly designed and highly interactive, AppleMagazine will also keep you updated on the latest weekly news. It's that simple! It’s all about Apple and its worldwide culture influence, all in one place, and only one tap away. Get AppleMagazine digital subscription today.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Ivan Castilho de Almeida
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$34.99
26 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
apple orchestrates deal for song-recognition app shazam

Apple has bought Shazam, the maker of a song-recognition app that Apple’s digital assistant Siri has already been using to help people identify the music playing on their iPhones.The companies didn’t disclose the price of the acquisition announced early this week. Technology news site Recode previously reported Apple is paying about $400 million for Shazam, citing three unidentified people familiar with the deal.Apple Inc. issued a statement describing Shazam as “natural fit” with its services.“We have exciting plans in store, and we look forward to combining with Shazam,” Apple said. The Cupertino, California, company declined to say whether Shazam’s app will still be available after the deal closes. Some of Shazam’s features conceivably could be blended into Apple’s music streaming services, w hich has accumulated more than 27…

access_time3 min.
bitcoin futures soar amid frenzy over virtual currency

Bitcoin’s debut on a major U.S. exchange is a hit so far, with the price of the first-ever futures contract for the virtual currency rising 16 percent.The futures contract that expires in January was up $2,440 to $17,900 Monday afternoon on the Chicago Board Options Exchange. Trading began Sunday, and the price rose as high as $18,850, according to data from the CBOE.The CBOE futures don’t involve actual bitcoin. They allow investors to make bets on the future direction of bitcoin.The first session of futures trading fit right in with the frenzy surrounding bitcoin. Traffic to the CBOE website was so heavy right after the start of trading that the site experienced outages. The exchange also halted trading twice Sunday to stem volatility. The exchange operator has rules in…

access_time2 min.
insider q&a: paypal founder talks digital payments, bitcoin

Max Levchin helped introduce the masses to the concept of a digital wallet when he co-founded PayPal in the late 1990s.These days, he’s still trying to use online services to reshape the world of finance. He is currently CEO of Affirm, a San Francisco startup that offers fixed-payment loans through the internet. It’s an alternative to traditional credit cards, which can get consumers into trouble because small minimum payments they make each month can keep them in debt for decades.Levchin, now 42, recently connected with media to discuss the state of digital payments, computer security and bitcoin, a cryptocurrency whose value has ranged from about $1,000 to more than $19,000 this year as investors have bet on its future prospects. The interview has been edited for length and clarity.…

access_time1 min.
cellphone company t-mobile to launch tv service next year

T-Mobile says it’s launching a TV service next year, becoming the latest company to marry wireless and video.The nation’s No. 3 wireless carrier said this week that it bought cable-TV startup Layer3 TV to help it roll out its upcoming service. T-Mobile’s press release has few details, but promises to address consumer complaints such as “sky-high bills” and “exploding bundles.”T-Mobile didn’t disclose how much it paid for Layer3, which is available in five U.S. cities.T-Mobile’s has shaken up the wireless industry by largely getting rid of two-year phone contracts and helping bring back unlimited-data plans.T-Mobile has already taken steps to connect its wireless business to video as the telecom, tech and media industries grow closer together. For instance, many T-Mobile wireless customers are getting Netflix for free. ■…

access_time1 min.
apple has its investment shoes on this week

Apple has made its second notable investment this week, the latest into the facial recognition technology company, Finisar.The $390 million investment announced Wednesday comes from Apple’s $1 billion Advanced Manufacturing Fund, created to finance the work of domestic manufacturers and create jobs in the U.S.Apple announced the creation of the fund in May and plowed $200 million into Corning Inc., the maker of the Gorilla Glass that is used in Apple’s touchscreens. The Finisar investment will help the company boost production of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, which Apple uses for Face ID, Animoji and Portrait mode selfies with the iPhone X TrueDepth camera and the proximity-sensing capabilities of AirPods. Finisar will open a manufacturing plant in Sherman, Texas, about an hour north of Dallas, creating more than 500 jobs.…

access_time2 min.
some of facebook’s early friends now its sharpest critics

Some of Facebook’s former friends are starting to express some serious doubts about the social network they helped create.Facebook exploits a “vulnerability in human psychology” to addict its users, Sean Parker, the company’s first president, said in a public forum last month. Chamath Palihapitiya, a former Facebook vice president who joined the company in 2007, recently told an audience at Stanford that the company is “ripping apart the social fabric of how society works.”And Roger McNamee, a venture capitalist and early investor in both Facebook and Google, wrote that both companies “threaten public health and democracy” in an August USA Today op-ed. (Image: David Paul Morris) It has been a rough year for the tech industry, especially social media companies. It opened with concerns about fake news and “filter…

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