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category_outlined / Coches y Motos
AutomobileAutomobile

Automobile

November 2019

Automobile is an award-winning automotive publication that captures the passion and experience of driving great cars. Featuring engaging writing and stunning photography, Automobile transports readers with each and every issue. Discover a well-rounded editorial mix focused on design, technology, automotive art, vintage cars, and industry trends.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
TEN: The Enthusiast Network
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12 Números

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access_time2 min.
automobile magazine

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Michael Floyd INTERNATIONAL BUREAU CHIEF Angus MacKenzie EXECUTIVE EDITOR Mac Morrison CREATIVE DIRECTOR Darren Scott DETROIT BUREAU CHIEF Todd Lassa SENIOR EDITOR Nelson Ireson SENIOR EDITOR Aaron Gold FEATURES EDITOR Rory Jurnecka MANAGING EDITOR Rusty Kurtz SENIOR COPY EDITOR Jesse Bishop COPY EDITOR Claire Crowley EDITORIAL PRODUCTION SPECIALIST Ryan Ono EUROPEAN BUREAU CHIEF George Kacher AUTOMOTIVE DESIGN EDITOR Robert Cumberford NEW YORK BUREAU CHIEF Jamie Kitman EDITOR-AT-LARGE Arthur St. Antoine AUTOMOBILE DIGITAL SENIOR EDITOR Erik Johnson ONLINE EDITOR Ed Tahaney DAILY NEWS EDITOR Conner Golden PRODUCTION EDITOR Eleonor Segura DIRECTOR, SOCIAL MEDIA Brandon Scarpelli SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Billy Rehbock CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Ronald Ahrens, Brett Berk, Jethro Bovingdon, Elana Scherr, Jon Alain Guzik, Bob Merlis, Chris Nelson, Marc Noordeloos, Andy Pilgrim, Steven Cole Smith, Lawrence Ulrich, Basem Wasef CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS Daniel Byrne, Martyn Goddard, Steffen Jahn, Evan Klein, Julia LaPalme, James Lipman, Charlie Magee, Richard Pardon, Tim Marrs, Tom Salt, Jürgen Skarwan, Dean Smith, Andrew Trahan ADVERTISING WEST: 831…

access_time4 min.
global b is the place to be

SOMEWHAT LOST AMONG the reams of juicy details—495 horses! Less than 60 grand! No manual?!?!—that gushed out recently about the all-new mid-engine Corvette was the fact the C8 uses what General Motors calls its Global B electrical architecture. GM officials on hand during the reveal of the new ’Vette, including the car’s chief engineer, Tadge Juechter (hear more from him on page 88), pointed to Global B as one of the key elements behind how Chevy was able to deliver what many thought would be a far more expensive car. It’s all about economies of scale, and Global B, announced earlier this year, will scale its way into almost every GM vehicle by 2023. Hence, the company did not have to spend who knows how much to develop a bespoke system…

access_time10 min.
found in translation

“This is a legendary road.” That can be said of many great routes, but in the case of the Daegwallyeong pass over Korea’s eastern mountains, it is literal. Legend has it a famous Confucian philosopher, Yi I, traveled over it in the 1500s on his way from the East Sea to Seoul. Amazed at its steepness and curves, he ate a single pomegranate seed for each turn. At the end, he’d consumed 99 seeds. He called the road kubigubi, a phrase that translates, roughly, as “crazily curvy.” In fact, spiky, foliage-covered mountains make up some 70 percent of Korea’s countryside. Although long the bane of tired travelers, today these roads are the great delight of a different kind of philosopher—those who tune chassis and suspensions. Former BMW M engineer Albert Biermann is…

access_time8 min.
no expectations

I FELT BAD for our photographer because I couldn’t answer any of his numerous questions. He knew everything I did: We would travel to Iceland, and beneath a midnight sun, we would ride pull-start minibikes and drive $500 cars through the desolate Highlands. I told him as much, but he wasn’t convinced. All I could say was, “Don’t worry. This is how the Gambler 500 works.” The Gambler 500 started as an email chain between friends who decided to go off-road in $500 cars never intended to be driven off-road. There would be no winners or losers, and there were only two rules, which remain the event’s only rules: clean up the trail as you go, and don’t be a jerk. On weekends they met at Wanker’s Corner Saloon outside of…

access_time11 min.
racing is what racing was except it isn’t.

HURLEY HAYWOOD abhors being late. As a three-time champion of the 24 Hours of Le Mans and a five-time winner of the Rolex 24 at Daytona, arriving anywhere first is a trait that’s served the 72-year-old well during his 30-plus years as a race car driver. But at the moment, “Early Hurley” is stuck in an elevator smaller than a bathtub—with seven other people—for nearly half an hour. Perhaps more upsetting than this claustrophobic predicament is the threat to Haywood’s punctuality. Even worse: As the grand marshal of the 2019 24 Hours of Le Mans in June, he’s a guest of honor at a Rolex-sponsored dinner to kick off the famous endurance race. But the finicky elevator within the control tower of the Automobile Club de l’Ouest’s complex in France has…

access_time6 min.
choose wisely within a shifting paradigm

LIKE THE CHEERING throngs that met giant steamships pulling into New York Harbor back in the glory days of ocean travel, clamoring investors eagerly awaited initial public offerings this year of mammoth ride-hailing services Lyft and Uber. They might as well have lined Wall Street, waving straw boaters in a dockside confetti parade as they gathered to welcome the boatload of cash that was meant to disembark. Except then it was as if this towering liner of modern commerce had only just put in, then suddenly exploded, sinking and killing thousands before a helpless and horror-stricken crowd. Lyft’s stock tanked after its hopeful March IPO. In May, Uber’s first public offering failed to even meet its projected price, much less exceed it, as the market prefers. Both scanned as tragedy for…

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