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Bowhunter April/May 2019

Bowhunter brings you expert advice from legendary Bowhunters! Each issue is filled with updates from major bowhunting organizations, coverage of bowhunting locations across North America, complete coverage of the sport and much more.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
KSE Sportsman Media, Inc.
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SUSCRIBIRSE
US$ 23,94
10 Números

EN ESTE NÚMERO

access_time2 min.
a most difficult goodbye

JUST DAYS before this issue went to press, the Bowhunter Family suffered a heartbreaking loss. My predecessor, my mentor and my friend, Dwight Schuh, lost his eight-year battle with cancer. Shortly after his retirement in 2010, Dwight was diagnosed with multiple myeloma, the result of his exposure to Agent Orange during his military service in Vietnam. He served his country and paid the ultimate price. Dwight was 73. As I write these words, I have just returned from Nampa, Idaho, where Publisher Jeff Waring and I attended Dwight Schuh’s Celebration of Life. It was a beautiful service that highlighted the inspirational life of this man, a true icon in the world of bowhunting. But Dwight was more than a bowhunter. He was a brilliant writer and exceptional Editor of this publication…

access_time3 min.
between bowhunters

MUST-SEE TV Dear Bowhunter, I have been hunting for more than 40 years, but I only just took up bowhunting three years ago at the age of 58. I enjoy your TV show very much, and I look forward to it each week as it offers me the tips and tactics I need to improve my game. I always tell my hunting buddies that anyone can take an animal with a gun, but not everyone can take one with a bow. Keep up the good work! Ken Ferguson, New Brunswick, Canada Curt Wells responds: Ken, thanks so much for the nice comments about Bow-hunter TV . I’m glad you have joined our ranks and that you’re enjoying the bow-hunting experience. It’s unusual to start bowhunting at your age, but we need every bowhunter we…

access_time5 min.
tracking archery rangefinders

JUST LAST OCTOBER I watched a wide-racked mule deer bed on a near-vertical slope. I had been hunting this specific Montana buck for over two weeks, and almost everything that could go wrong had. As I glassed from 400 yards, I realized this was my best stalking opportunity so far. A lone, dead pine was directly above the buck, and as I tiptoed the final 30 yards, I took several distance and angle measurements to rocks and foliage below. A muley doe bolted from a dip below me, and the buck stood to gawk around beside a bush I’d already measured. The actual distance was 30 yards, but the 22-degree angle meant a 25-yard hold. I had already done the math in my head. The Hoyt bow thumped, the Easton arrow flickered, and…

access_time7 min.
bowhunting predators

THE LOUD SHRILLS of my Circe jackrabbit call echoed across the vast, pinyon-juniper landscape. Moments later, a flash of hair caught my eye amidst the shrubs and golden rod-colored grass. Suddenly, at about 30 yards away, the unmistakable head of a coyote bobbed into plain view, now with its eyes fixed on my location. I froze, despite a surge of excitement racing through my camoclad body. Experience told me this canine would vanish with the slightest bit of movement, so I did not dare move a muscle. But as soon as the ‘yote turned his head for a few fleeting seconds, I seized the moment and quickly hit full draw. I held my 30-yard pin just below the coyote’s vitals and applied back tension until the shot was gone. The Rage Hypodermic…

access_time1 min.
plan for quick shooting

Bowhunting predators and fast shots go hand in hand, given how quickly a coyote, fox or bobcat rushes the sound of a call. This means an excited bowhunter must be able to hook up fast, draw, and shoot with lightning-like speed, or risk losing a great shooting opportunity. Be sure your release aid hooks up fast to your string loop. If there are issues, try switching to a firmer string-loop material. I typically use a softer, more pliable loop material for most shooting applications to minimize torque and to increase forgiveness when using different styles of release aids. However, for predator hunting and some big-game hunting, I like a faster hook-up. In this case, I insist on using a stiffer, more rigid loop material, such as BCY’s #24, which is .079-inch…

access_time4 min.
first time for everything

I DON’T BUY that firsts are always best in life. I think this is something that commercials, songs, and ad gimmicks like to push. We have all heard it. Things like the magic of your first kiss, your first love, the first time you drive a car, the first time you hear that special song... Don’t get me wrong — it all sounds nice. But I have found that for me, the first time I do something is usually awkward, possibly dangerous, and oftentimes uncomfortable. My first kiss was awful. I didn’t really like the girl, and I honestly think she went to the movies with me because she lost a bet. My first love broke my heart, so that’s not even a good memory, much less a magical first. The first…

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