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CARDINALS YEARBOOKCARDINALS YEARBOOK

CARDINALS YEARBOOK

2015

Which Cardinals photo sits atop your stack of all-time favorites? Is it David Freese icing Game 6 of the 2011 World Series with a homer and helmet spike just before the stroke of midnight? Maybe it’s Waino and Yadi doing the midair “bump” after the last out of the 2006 World Series. Or perhaps it’s Ray Lankford trucking Darren Daulton in one of the biggest bang-ups that ever happened at home plate. Whatever your favorite, rest assured they’re featured in our anthology of the most treasured Cardinals images EVER ASSEMBLED in one volume with our 2016 Official Yearbook. This stunning visual feast also presents the stories behind the photographs, as told by Redbird legends making history as focal points of the photos and the photographers who were capturing it. This 212-page keepsake is perfect for Cardinals fans of any age this upcoming holiday shopping season.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
MLB Advanced Media, LP
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EN ESTE NÚMERO

5 min.
front office directory

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS Chairman / Chief Executive Officer ............................Bill DeWitt Jr. President...................................................................... Bill DeWitt III Senior Administrative Assistant ............................ Julie Laningham Senior Vice President / General Counsel, Asst. Secretary...Mike Whittle Senior Administrative Assistant ......................................Grace Kell Vice President, Business Development ...............................Dan Good BASEBALL OPERATIONS Senior Vice President and General Manager................. John Mozeliak Senior Executive Assistant to the GM........................ Linda Brauer Assistant General Manager ............................................Mike Girsch Manager, Baseball Development.............................. Jeremy Cohen Developers, Baseball Development.... Patrick Casanta, Bryan Seygert Analysts, Baseball Development................Matt Bayer, Kevin Seats, Dane Sorensen Senior Special Assistant to the GM ...........................Mike Jorgensen Special Assistants to the General Manager....................... Cal Eldred, Ryan Franklin, Willie McGee, Red Schoendienst Director, Player Personnel................................................ Matt Slater Director, Major League Administration......... Judy Carpenter-Barada Director, Player Development .................................. Gary LaRocque Player Development Coordinator..............................Tony Ferreira Director, Baseball Administration..................................... John Vuch Professional Scouts.......................... Nick Brannon, Patrick Elkins, Jeff Ishii, Marty Keough, Deric McKamey, Richard Meinhold, Joe Rigoli, Kerry Robinson Special Assistant to Amateur Scouting.........................…

3 min.
tales beyond number

Without uniform numbers, how would a kid’s baseball fantasy be complete? What child hasn’t been No. 20 on the basepaths, No. 45 when taking the mound for a must-win game, No. 1 when making a backhanded stab at short or No. 6 when a two-out hit was needed to overcome an opponent’s ninth-inning lead. Which makes you wonder what young Cardinals fans did for the first 30-something years the club played in the National League, because uniform numbers were virtually missing in action until the team permanently adopted them at the start of the 1932 season. There’s no denying that in the 83 years since, a Cardinal player’s number has become one of the primary ways we link him to our mind’s eye. And considering that more than 1,300 players have donned…

10 min.
a game of numbers

The numerals on the brick wall high above right-center field at Busch Stadium don’t have names adjacent to them. In Cardinal Nation, names are unnecessary. Those figures alone speak volumes. Even beyond the pantheon of retired Cardinal numbers, we don’t need someone to tell us who wore No. 51, who wears No. 4, or the little guy we all loved who sported No. 99. And we don’t have to think twice to recall the two guys who blasted a bushel of bombshells wearing No. 5 and No. 25. In this case, we aren’t alone – ballplayers and the numbers on their backs have become virtually synonymous across baseball and every other major sport. Many players instinctively include their uniform numbers as part of their autograph. Numbers are integral to marketing and merchandising efforts…

3 min.
daunting assignment

Anyone worthy of his or her drawer full of Cardinals T-shirts can tell you that Yadier Molina wears No. 4, Adam Wainwright dons 50, Matt Carpenter 13, Matt Holliday 7 and so on. The number defines the man. But how did the man get his number? That’s not so obvious. The process of assigning major league jersey numbers can be simple or convoluted. It can take seconds or it can take days. The result can be temporary or it can last a career. Consider this a Top 10 of rules and rites on dishing out numbers that, like many other rules in baseball, are mostly unwritten. 1. The equipment manager makes the call. For the Cardinals, Rip Rowan has been in charge since 2003. He sometimes confers with ownership and often consults with players, but…

204 min.
cardinals all-time uniform rosters

BASEBALL’S BEST AT 1 Richie Ashburn Earle Combs Bobby Doerr Tony Fernandez Billy Martin Pee Wee Reese Bobby Richardson Lou Whitaker TOPS IN 2015 Jose IglesiasTigers NUMBER ONE @ 1 OZZIE SMITH The man synonymous with “Go crazy, folks, go crazy!” gave us plenty of reason to do so. Jack Buck’s famous call of Ozzie’s 1985 NLCS homer off Tom Niedenfuer still reverberates across our consciousness, echoing a career of defensive brilliance and offensive consistency. “The Wizard” was named to 15 All-Star teams. By the time he arrived in St. Louis in 1982 after a trade with San Diego, he already was a master craftsman, having won two Gold Gloves as a Padre. The Hall of Famer would win 11 more (in a row) as a Cardinal on his way to recognition as the greatest defensive shortstop ever to play the game. He…

1 min.
a stand-in at 6

In 1945, the Cardinals needed someone to help pick up the lineup slack after outfielder Stan Musial had signed up for the Navy and reported for duty. They’d find some answers in the person of a player who would go on to be Musial’s lifelong friend – Red Schoendienst. With left fielder Danny Litwhiler also headed into the service, the rookie Schoendienst was installed in left and given the jersey number Musial had worn since coming to the majors in September 1941. As the last man other than “the Man” to wear the number, the promising 22-year-old Schoendienst would hold up more than his share of the load in ’45. Red hit .278 and had a league-leading 26 stolen bases. It was the spark for a 19-year Hall of Fame career. But…