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Classic Bike GuideClassic Bike Guide

Classic Bike Guide January 2019

Classic Bike Guide is a down to earth, practical - and sometimes irreverent - magazine that gets right to the heart of the classic bike world. With a mixture of features, tests, reviews and event reports it is the title that has become a must for the active rider and restorer. Classic Bike Guide magazine - with the biggest and best readers adverts - FREE! Enjoy the digital edition - and save over 50% on the print susbcription price.

País:
United Kingdom
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Mortons Media Group, Ltd
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12 Números

EN ESTE NÚMERO

access_time3 min.
happy new year trend-setters!

Firstly, may I, on behalf of all who work at Classic Bike Guide towers, wish you a warm and prosperous New Year! May your bolts not round off, your petrol not turn stale and your tyres be eternally pumped up. And if you see a mild forecast over the festive period, keep away from the sherry – some wonderful rides with quiet roads can be had while the rest of the world are cramming mince pies into their already-bloated bellies. If ever you’re feeling the years then relax – we are trendsetters! The annual Motorcycle Live show was busy and saw even more new bikes featuring a classic style, with Norton releasing two new, affordable and frankly great-looking 650 bikes – the Atlas and Nomad; Triumph giving over half their stand…

access_time2 min.
from our archive

GERMAN GRAND PRIX NURBURGRING, 1930 Started in 1925 and finished in 1927, the Nurburgring was a purpose-built racetrack and is one of motorsport’s seven wonders. The idea was to use the undulating hills of the Eifel mountains to re-create famous road circuits like the Italian Targa FIorio. It had several different layouts including a North loop and South loop – add them together and in the early years the complete track was 17.5 miles long. Motorcycles started on the North loop (12.7 miles) and on the South loop (five miles) in different years. Many racers protested about the length, bumps and safety over the years, including Ago and Formula 1 never returned after Niki Lauda’s accident in 1976, when his terrible injuries were made worse due to the time it took for services…

access_time10 min.
dream machine one man’s vision of the perfect motorcycle

When he was a teenager, Jon deBouhn rode a second-hand BSA B50MX on and off-road, and a 750cc Bonnie to A Archer & Son in Essex, the respected vintage vehicle restoration experts, where he was doing a four-year engineering apprenticeship. However, when he finished his apprenticeship in 1984 the British motorcycle industry was on its knees, while BMW was big news. “They made the bikes to beat in the Dakar,” says Jon. “The G/S always seemed to finish the race without many problems. While other manufacturers were changing engines, BMW’s mechanics were changing the oil.” Now qualified and with a handsome increase in salary, he immediately bought a new R80G/S. “What a bike!” Jon says with a smile. “It was so much better than the Bonnie and touring 600 miles in one…

access_time1 min.
win a ‘new’ 1977 norton commando

THE LATEST RAFFLE prize on offer from the National Motorcycle Museum (NMM) is another desirable rarity – a new old stock 1977 Norton Commando. The NMM announced this latest prize after revealing the results of the summer 2018 raffle to win a 1969 Royal Enfield Interceptor Mk II 750cc. The raffle was drawn by TT and road racing superstars John McGuinness, Mick Grant and Trevor Nation at the Museum LIVE open day. The Interceptor was won by Craig Winter from Carmarthenshire. The second prize, a 1955 James ML125, was won by David Fallon of Leicestershire. Launching the winter raffle, museum director James Hewing said: “We have something very special for our winter raffle by offering a brand-new old stock 1977 Commando, which has never been run or registered and is showing just…

access_time1 min.
new norton bears the name atlas

ANOTHER RESURGENT BRITISH manufacturer has revived an old name for its latest machine with Norton unveiling its first middleweight twin-cylinder motorcycle since the 650cc Mercury went out of production in 1969. The new 650cc Atlas Nomad and Atlas Ranger twins are designed as entry-level machines and will be the first mainstream production machines from Norton since the 1970s. The Atlas name was last used on Norton’s 1960s 750cc Featherbed framed superbike. The new Norton uses an engine with elements derived from the company’s own high performance V4 RR superbike in a steel trellis frame. Norton says the use of steel, rather than aluminium is ideal for a dual purpose off-roader like the Atlas. The in-house produced 84bhp 650cc engine has a 270° crankshaft and uses the V4’s cylinder head, while the rest of…

access_time1 min.
vincent legend patrick godet dies

THE DEATH HAS been reported of highly-regarded Vincent builder Patrick Godet. Godet was born into a family of road hauliers, spending years working on lorries before pursuing a career in the automotive industry. He bought his first Vincent on leaving the army in 1973. A member of the Vincent Owners’ Club after joining in 1974, he founded the club’s French branch. In 1979 he raced a Vincent Black Lightning in prestigious races. With wins in England and on the European mainland, he went on to become a well-known name in the 1980s classic racing scene. In the early 1990s, Godet imported a batch of Vincents and a stock of spare parts from Argentina and opened a workshop dedicated to their restoration. His restoration of an Egli-Vincent finally brought him into contact with Fritz…

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