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Golf MagazineGolf Magazine

Golf Magazine January 2019

Golf Magazine is the number one source for golf instruction, equipment and travel, including: exclusive instruction from our Top 100 Teachers in America, introspective interviews with the game’s rising stars and old masters, and short-game tips from guru David Pelz. Plus, you’ll get the latest in gear, including ClubTest equipment reviews, and private lessons, tips personalized for your game.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
EB Golf Media
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how to use the scan-it/see-it digital feature in this issue

HOW IT WORKS Invisible watermarks on select photos act as gateways to bonus videos. With the Digimarc app, your smartphone or tablet recognizes the watermarks and automatically delivers the content to your device. 1 Download and open the Digimarc Discover app on your smartphone or camera-capable tablet. The app is free and is available at the iTunes store for Apple devices and at the Google Play market for Android devices. 2 Position the phone four to seven inches above any photo bearing the yellow SCAN THIS PHOTO label (example, right), as if you were taking a picture (flash optional). If you have access to a Wi-Fi connection, downloads will be faster. 3 Hold the camera steady. The app will click and buzz when it recognizes the image and then begin downloading the described content…

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next steps

“CHANGE IS GOOD,” the saying goes. Golf has seen a lot of it, even in the quick window of the past dozen years—a blip in the game’s long history. Twelve years ago, only the very well dialed-in among us knew how much backspin they produced with their driver, or what their launch angle and swing-speed numbers might be. Twelve years ago, we were still buying yardage guides in pro shops (at least I was), calling courses directly to book tee times and playing wedges without any real consideration of bounce and sole grind. Twelve years ago, the thought of Tour players sharing vacation and baby pics with their fans—often in real-time—seemed unnecessary, if not absurd. Just last week a Top 100 Teacher delivered an artificial intelligence–fueled, bespoke game-improvement plan straight to…

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now on the tee: your raves, rants and reactions

SWING THOUGHTS Your recent story on Mr. Gankas (“Curious George,” November) intrigued me. I’d never heard of him and I thought, well, let’s see what this is all about. I searched him out on YouTube and found many videos to choose from. Picking one at random with a title that seemed most relevant to my interests, guess what I found? George Gankas, the latest “it” boy of golf gurus, is teaching his secret move to increase swing speed, a move that I was taught almost 50 years ago at Pinehurst’s summer golf camp by Ely Callaway and Clyde Mangum. Not to be downer, but there really is nothing new under the sun. —EUGENE ELY, VIA E-MAIL UNVARNISHED VARNER Michael Bamberger’s November column on Harold Varner III (“The World According to Harold”) was well written…

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teeing off

ONCE UPON A TIME IN MEXICO In this, our first issue of 2019, we celebrate the brightest of golf’s future. (Our read: really bright!) The focus, appropriately, is on the new, the next, the young, the strong. The studs leaping from our cover (Niemann, Champ, Burns), of course, possess these qualities in spades. We found that out when we caught up with them in Mexico, in early November, at the Mayakoba Golf Classic, a Tour event held at El Camaleon Golf Course, in Cancun. At left is the Caribbean-close third green on that gorgeous Greg Norman design. (You can read more about it on page 77.) So, yes, youth will definitely be served in this issue. But if we may, for a moment, pause to appreciate the more seasoned among us. For…

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eye to eye ready, set, beau

If you had to, how would you grade your first season on the PGA Tour? I guess a C. I did a lot of positive things, but it certainly wasn’t up to par. I don’t think there are many guys out here who are competitive who are gonna be really satisfied with anything, right? I mean, as much success as you have, you always want more. That’s what keeps you going and keeps you working hard. At last year’s Houston Open, you played in the final group on Sunday, ultimately losing in a playoff to Ian Poulter. What did you learn, being in that situation for the first time on Tour? At every level I’ve played, it’s been a bit of an adjustment once I’ve gotten into contention. At the pro level, Houston…

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brian’s song

BRIAN DAVIS might be the unluckiest player in the history of the PGA Tour. He has never had an ace in competition, a streak of futility that is now at 4,529 par 3s and counting. As of this writing he has made 359 starts on Tour without a victory, the longest drought among all active players. (Omar Uresti, 50, is winless in 368 starts but is now focused on the Champions tour). One of Davis’s best chances to win came at Hilton Head in 2010, in a playoff against Jim Furyk, but, while attempting a recovery shot from the edge of Calibogue Sound, he brushed a tiny loose impediment in the hazard during his backswing, a two-stroke penalty that doomed Davis to defeat. (He alerted officials to what might have…

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