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Guitar TechniquesGuitar Techniques

Guitar Techniques

November 2019

Take the UK's foremost guitar teachers and players, and transfer their finesse and passion for music into a magazine! The magazine has established itself with guitarists who wish to better themselves as musicians in both the UK, Europe and as far afield as the USA and Hong Kong! When it comes to choosing music, GT's Abba to Zappa policy means that there's always something for everyone! Please note: This digital version of the magazine does not currently include the covermount items or content you would find on printed newsstand copies

País:
United Kingdom
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Future Publishing Ltd
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13 Números

EN ESTE NÚMERO

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just a few of your regular gt technique experts...

SIMON BARNARD Simon is a graduate of ACM and The Guitar Institute, holding a Masters degree in music. He teaches, examines and plays everything from rock to jazz. SHAUN BAXTER One of the UK’s most respected music educators, Shaun has taught many who are now top tutors themselves. His Jazz Metal album is considered a milestone. RICHARD BARRETT One of the finest blues and rock guitarist we know, Richard is a stalwart columnist for Total Guitar, Guitarist and GT. He’s also Tony Hadley’s touring six-stringer. JON BISHOP Jon is one of those great all-rounders who can turn his hand to almost any style. He’s also rock legend Shakin Stevens’ touring and recording guitarist. MARTIN GOULDING One of the world’s foremost rock and metal guitarists, Martin teaches for dime-online.org and has written for many of the world’s top guitar mags. CHARLIE…

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welcome

STEVIE RAY VAUGHAN! The first time I heard him was when my dear departed friend Jeff Pumfrett (he of Machinehead Music and World Guitars, but Fender service manager when I was their UK guitar repairer in the early 80s), gave me a cassette of Texas Flood. I have to confess, it left me feeling rather ambivalent. I could clearly hear Jimi and Albert, plus a bit of Freddie and Eric, but, despite the obvious passion and clear ability, preferred the ‘real thing’. It also slightly irritated me that everyone it seemed was citing him as the creator of this style, when to these ears he had merely repackaged my heroes with more oomph (I forgot to remember that this was me exactly when Eric and Jimi first arrived!). And, just as…

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check out our amazing digital edition

Tap the links Finding your way around the magazine is easy. Tapping the feature titles on the cover or the contents page, takes you straight to the relevant articles. Any web and email links in the text are tappable too! Animated tab & audio All the mag’s main lessons have the audio built in with a moving cursor that shows you exactly where you are in the music. Simply tap the ‘play’ button and you’re off - you can fast-forward or scroll back at will. Play the videos Certain articles have accompanying videos full of useful insight and additional information. Once again, tap the play buttons to enjoy video masterclasses on your iPad (recommended) or smartphone. PLUS! * PLEASE NOTE: Only the Apple version contains interactive tab and audio. Zinio and others do not. DISC AUDIO (PRINT VERSION…

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food for thought

Sitting in my studio is an incredible new pedalboard made by Schmidt Array. I’m sure you’ve seen them around because all the cool kids are using them (Ariel Posen, Joey Landreth, That Pedal Show, Andy Martin, Pete Honore etc.). They’re all kinds of awesome but have a matching price tag. But now it’s sitting here, I’m wondering if it’s all going too far, or not far enough. When I started using pedals my ‘pedalboard’ was a plywood strip (cut with a hand saw and lightly sanded) with my pedals held down using rubber bands. I wish I had a photo somewhere; maybe I should recreate it for Insta-cred? Most of the guys I knew just put the pedals on the floor and plugged them in when they got to the gig,…

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session shenanigans

Over the years I have discovered from personal experience that there are at least two facets of the entertainment business about which the average person aboard the Clapham omnibus (delayed due to an incident at Tooting) appears to be a self-appointed world authority. Moreover, this bestows an entitlement both to express and share said opinions with a confidence remarkable for its volume, passion and frequency and the scatter-gun direction in which it is fired. Of course, it assists enormously that this behaviour is in no way inhibited by a tenuous grip on facts, with which (as any fule kno) you can prove pretty much anything. I refer, of course, to the popular pastimes of Association football and music respectively. With regard to the former, the act of purchasing a seat at Stadio…

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instrumental inquisition!

GT: What is it about guitar instrumentals that particularly appeals to you? DA: Well, for one thing, there’s no stinking lead vocalist stepping on the guitar, haha! Seriously, I love it when I can feel what the guitar is saying with melody and nuances that get lost on lyrics sometimes. Sometimes I think just a guitar melody is the strongest statement you can make. GT: What can an instrumental tune provide the listener that a vocal song can’t? DA: I think it opens up the imagination for some people. Or if it’s a shred type thing, that may appeal to others. GT: Are there any tendencies with instrumentals that you aim to embrace or avoid? DA: I look for melodies now more than ever. That’s what it’s about for me. But then I’m also looking…

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