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Hemmings Motor NewsHemmings Motor News

Hemmings Motor News September 2019

Every issue is packed with hundreds of pages of auction news, car profi les, buyer's guides, restoration profiles, technical advice, event coverage, and a classified section that is THE PLACE to find high quality listings of cars, parts, and services for sale.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
American City Business Journals_Hemmings
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SUSCRIBIRSE
US$ 20
12 Números

EN ESTE NÚMERO

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tripping on a tough question

The Chief and I are at an impasse. After years of blissful marital negotiations over everything from what furniture we should buy (whatever she wants) to whether or not I should splurge on that new plasma cutter (she probably won’t notice it in the garage, anyway), we’re deadlocked on one of the most important questions I can think of. (Aside, of course, from: who makes the best French fries around here or exactly how much longer before I get some pizza?) This important question pertains to vehicles. As in, my next purchase of one. Seriously? you’re wondering. With all the issues facing the world today, all you can think about is what kind of vehicle you want to buy? Answer: Yes. Well, that and those things about fries or pizza. Look, I…

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hemmings motor news

PUBLISHER Jim Menneto, President Jonathan Shaw, Director of Product EDITORIAL Terry McGean, Editor-in-Chief Richard Lentinello, Executive Editor Kurt Ernst, Editor, Hemmings Daily Mike McNessor, Editor, Hemmings Motor News Catherine Gee Graney, Managing Editor Thomas A. DeMauro, Senior Editor Matthew Litwin, Senior Editor Mark J. McCourt, Senior Editor David Conwill, Associate Editor Jeff Koch, West Coast Associate Editor Terry Shea, Associate Editor Daniel Strohl, Web Editor Edward Heys, Design Editor Judi Dell’Anno, Graphic Designer Joshua Skibbee, Graphic Designer Jim O’Clair, Columnist/Parts Locator Tom Comerro, Editorial Assistant Jake McBride, Editorial Intern EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTORS Michael Milne ADVERTISING Jennifer Sandquist, Advertising Director DISPLAY SALES Tim Redden, Internet Sales Manager Account Executives: Rowland George, Tim McCart, Lesley McFadden, Heather Naslund, Mark Nesbit, Collins Sennett, Bonnie Stratton Stephanie Sigot, Advertising Coordinator CLASSIFIED SALES Jeanne Bourn, Classified Manager Allen Boulet, Marcus Bowler, Tammy Bredbenner, Mary Brott, Raina Burgess,…

access_time4 min.
paying for restoration

I never thought I would ever pay someone to repair or restore a car for me, but I finally surrendered. It was either, pay to have the much-needed work done so I can move onto the next phase of the car’s restoration, or let it sit, untouched, in the corner of my garage for the next 10 years, just like it had been for the last 10 years. Seeing how I’m not getting any younger, and time is passing by more quickly than I ever thought it would, if I am ever going to enjoy driving this Triumph of mine, best now to get the wheels in motion and have the work done — work that I am really not qualified to do anyway. The car in question is the 1960 Triumph…

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backfire

I enjoyed your British features in the July 2019 issue of HMN, as well as Mr. Lentinello’s article on page 8. I too fell into the British car genre somewhat by accident. My car is a 1948 Austin A40 Dorset two-door sedan, or “saloon” in British [pictured above]. It was purchased used by my grandfather sometime around 1954 or 1955. My mother drove it to college in 1956. As a child, I remember it sitting in Grandpa’s garage when we would go visit. My uncle did a “restoration” of sorts in the early 1980s. He changed the color to black with gold inner fenders and pinstripes. My grandmother reupholstered the interior in a matching gold-themed naugahyde material and gold-patterned cloth seat inserts, and topped it off with a leopard-patterned head…

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lee iacocca dead at 94

Automotive industry icon Lee Iacocca died July 2 at his Bel Air, California, home at age 94. Iacocca was afflicted with Parkinson’s, and his death was attributed to complications from the disease. Iacocca not only attained celebrity status at the helm of two of Detroit’s automakers, he defied the odds and made history by reversing the fortunes of the foundering Chrysler Corporation. He was the driving force behind the Ford Mustang, as well as the Ford Pinto — intended to be the compact car that would save Ford from the imports. Later, at the helm of Chrysler, Iacocca would spearhead the development of the domestic minivan, after rescuing the ailing automaker from potential bankruptcy with government cosigned loans and the practical, affordable K-car. Lido Anthony “Lee” Iacocca was born October 15, 1924, in…

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1952 nash-healy racer to appear at hemmings concours d’elegence

A rare Nash-Healy prototype that won its class at Le Mans in 1952 will vie for top honors at the Hemmings Concours d’Elegance in September. The historic racer, now owned by Jose Fernandez, was discovered in a chicken coop and restored by Redline Restorations in Bridgeport, Connecticut. The work was wrapped up earlier this year, and the Nash-Healey has returned to its winning ways, earning honors at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, the Greenwich Concours d’Elegance, and the Elegance at Hershey. The car was one of two campaigned at Le Mans in ’52, and is known as chassis X-6— X-5 was its sister car. X-5 and X-6 qualified 22nd and 19th, respectively, amid intense competition from Allard, Aston Martin, Cunningham, Ferrari, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche, and a host of others. X-5 didn’t finish the…

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