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Ride magazineRide magazine

Ride magazine March - April 2018

Ride magazine is a high quality cycling magazine that caters for both road and off-road cyclists, be they competitive or recreational riders. The magazine contains many timeless 'How to' and 'You can’ articles covering issues relating to health, fitness, skills, maintenance and nutrition. The average Ride magazine reader is health-conscious, goal-orientated, self-motivated, an outdoor enthusiast and a keen, regular traveller. Over the 14 years of its existence the magazine has played an important role in growing cycling into one of the biggest participation sports in South Africa.

País:
South Africa
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Silhouette Sportswear Manufacturer
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EN ESTE NÚMERO

access_time2 min.
new beginnings

WELCOME TO A BRAND NEW RIDE MAGAZINE. It looks a lot different, it probably smells different, and we hope you like it! 2018 is our 21st year in the business, time to grow up a little… So what have we done, and why? You will have noticed that the magazine is slightly smaller than before, yet much thicker. This allows us to use a different printing method, with nicer paper, and still keep a double-thick magazine on sale at R39. The smaller size is also a whole lot easier to read than a floppy old magazine, especially in planes, trains and bed. We have shifted from 12 issues a year to six, so we can tell the stories of African cycling properly – more pages means more space, which in turn means…

access_time4 min.
aha

When not potting in his shed, STEVE SHAPIRO can be found in his natural habitat, penning award-winning poems or pondering the wisdom of the Chosen Gear. In all these years of passionate pedalling, books and magazines constantly drew my attention to something which should have been so obvious: if your general parcel of man and machine tip the scales more modestly, you will begin to shimmy up the hills with more speed and less effort. That’s why the more expensive offerings tend to supplement what they lose on the beams and balances with what they gain at the cash register. Nowadays it might explain the otherwise inexplicable rise to prominence of plastic-like carbon fibre which, to my mind, is more about mass than it is about stiffness. There is something so…

access_time3 min.
we deserve better

It’s the beginning of 2018 and we all have our New Year’s resolutions. I am seeing a lot of women taking up cycling; the gyms and their Wattbikes are full, and the spinning classes are packed (mostly with women). Bike sales have gone up and, again mostly in the shape of women, there are first-timers in the sport. They have seen and heard so much about our sport at dinner parties and get-togethers, they now want to join this new trend. This is awesome news for everyone involved. But why are we seeing so few of the women at the local races? Are they asked to watch the kids rather than participate? Come on guys, take a turn, let your other halves have a chance at this wonderful sport we love…

access_time5 min.
but do you even pro, bro?

Recently at the Mpumalanga Cycle Tour, I noted something rather strange: at this road cycling tour (one of just a few on the road cycling calendar), there was near complete domination of the podiums by mountain bikers. Three of the top four riders came from the NAD Professional MTB Team. They won the overall GC, the KOM jersey and the best young rider category. I guess the road cyclists can count themselves lucky there weren’t more off-road teams on the start line… And Lord help them if the mountain bikers start working on the sprints, as that was the only place the road cyclists seem to have an edge. We have to ask ourselves how a local mountain-biking team could dominate our road cycling fraternity on their home turf like this. To…

access_time10 min.
wasser

No, my Namibian farmer friend, great glugs of bitter brew before passing out will not lessen tomorrow’s babelaas, nor will they facilitate the successful running of a major cycling event, in a time of almost catastrophic drought. You need water and the top organisers of these competitive sporting adventures, particularly in the desiccated Western Cape, are all applying their creative genius to making sure that it’s available. Road and off-road have different yet similar requirements and, of course, duration is critical but, ultimately, all are involved with guarding and prolonging what has become our most precious natural asset. It is, if nothing else, for historic and experiential reasons, the only road thinkers with whom I first posed the question. The Cape Town Cycle Tour, or the Argus, and David Bellairs, generalissimo…

access_time2 min.
a thousand words

HELL OF THE SOUTH Normally, riding your mountain bike in the last week of January in the Western Cape opens up the oven door to heat and dust and horrors only the Karoo can offer. Even more so currently as the region battles the fiercest drought in memory. So it was with great surprise that the 1 400 entrants in the 12th edition of the Momentum Health Attakwas Extreme, presented by Biogen, woke to cloudy skies and the threat of rain. A threat, indeed, that would present different monsters as riders battled mud, not dust, on their 121km journey from the Chandelier ostrich farm, near Oudtshoorn, to Pine Creek Resort in Groot Brak River. Both the men’s and women’s categories saw results that hinted of redemption: Spur’s Ariane Luthi won her sixth title,…

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