EXPLORARMI BIBLIOTECA
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Caza y Pesca
Shooting TimesShooting Times

Shooting Times

October 2019

Every issue of Shooting Times brings you exciting, authoritative coverage of guns, ammunition, reloading, and the shooting sports. Written for the experienced and novice gun enthusiast by focusing on new product developments and activities in the shooting industry.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
KSE Sportsman Media, Inc.
Leer Máskeyboard_arrow_down
SUSCRIBIRSE
US$ 23,98
12 Números

EN ESTE NÚMERO

access_time1 min.
shooting times

PUBLISHER Mike Schoby EDITORIAL EDITOR IN CHIEF Joel J. Hutchcroft COPY EDITOR Michael Brecklin CONTRIBUTORS Jake Edmondson Steve Gash Allan Jones Lane Pearce Layne Simpson Bart Skelton Joseph von Benedikt Terry Wieland ART ART DIRECTOR Stephan D. Ledeboer SENIOR CREATIVE DIRECTOR Tim Neher STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Michael Anschuetz PRODUCTION PRODUCTION MANAGER Terry Boyer PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Jenny Kaeb ENDEMIC AD SALES NATIONAL ENDEMIC SALES Jim McConville (440) 791-7017 WESTERN REGION Hutch Looney — hutch@hlooney.com MIDWEST REGION Mark Thiffault (720) 630-9863 EAST REGION Pat Bentzel (717) 695-8095 NATIONAL AD SALES ACCOUNT DIRECTOR—DETROIT OFFICE Kevin Donley (248) 798-4458 NATIONAL ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE—CHICAGO OFFICE Carl Benson (312) 955-0496 DIRECT RESPONSE ADVERTISING/NON-ENDEMIC Anthony Smyth (914) 693-8700…

access_time4 min.
beretta’s midsize gem

I want to congratulate Brad Miller and Shooting Times on the well-written and informative article on the Beretta Cheetah pistol. It had substance and a lot of very useful information. I found his knowledge and comparison to other firearms to be very informative. Termain Via email Meaningless Jargon I thoroughly enjoy reading Shooting Times and several other OSG publications, but I wish gun writers and editors would rid themselves of meaningless gun jargon. For years I’ve read the phrase “inherently accurate” to describe rifles and cartridges that are curiously more accurate than others. According to Webster’s, Oxford, and Cambridge dictionaries, “inherent” has two slightly different uses. “Inherent” is most commonly used to convey a natural or basic characteristic of something; a quality that is inborn, inseparable, or intrinsic, as in, “Concrete is inherently hard.” But…

access_time2 min.
taurus raging hunter .357 magnum

ORIGINALLY RELEASED IN .44 MAGNUM, THE TAURUS RAGING HUNTER big-game-hunting revolver is now available in .357 Magnum. The double-action revolver has a sleeved barrel with factory-tuned porting and a gas-expansion chamber (to reduce muzzle rise), cushioned grip inserts, a seven-round cylinder, a fully adjustable rear sight, and an integrated optics rail. Optional barrel lengths are 8.38, 6.25, and 5.13 inches. Finish options are matte black and two-tone satin stainless/matte black. MSRP: $919 taurususa.com Ruger Hawkeye Alaskan Ruger has reintroduced the Hawkeye Alaskan rifle chambered for the hard-hitting .375 Ruger, .338 Winchester Magnum, and .300 Winchester Magnum. Based on the popular Ruger Guide Gun platform, the Alaskan has a stainless-steel action, barrel, barrel band sling swivel stud, removable muzzle brake, bolt, and bottom metal; express-style adjustable rear sight; white-bead front sight; integral scope mounts;…

access_time1 min.
repaired savage model 99 stock?

Q : Joseph von Benedikt mentioned repairing the stock on his well-worn Savage 99 in his “The Shootist” column last month. I’d like to know more about how he made those repairs. Can he please expound on his process? Richie Perry Via email A: As I said, my Savage 99 in .22 Hi Power was made in 1915, and it looked like it had been dragged around behind a sheep camp for years. Massive chunks were missing from the buttstock and fore-end. The buttplate was missing, and a large portion of the toe was gone. The finish on the wood was worn away. Replacement stocks were not an option because of cost and because I wanted to preserve some of the vintage presence of the rifle. I resolved to patch up and use the…

access_time5 min.
winchester model 12 20 gauge

YEARS AGO, WITH A BORROWED 20-GAUGE WIN- chester Model 12 in my hands, an Oklahoma pheasant flushed wildly 40 yards away through the briars. I’d never fired the lively little shotgun, but it leapt to my shoulder and turned that distant rooster into a burst of drifting feathers. I resolved then and there that I’d someday own one. Introduced in 1912, Winchester’s internal-hammer, pump-action shotgun quickly rose to stardom. Balance was superb, ergonomics were the best yet built into a pump-action field gun, action smoothness was excellent, and reliability was unquestioned. Partially based on the genius inherent to John Browning’s Model 1897 exposed-hammer pump-action shotgun, the Model 12 has a more modern and practical internal hammer and several other improvements by designer T.C. Johnson. Loaded through the action’s bottom and fed from a…

access_time5 min.
light loads for the .30-06

RECENTLY, READER ROBB PIPER FROM PENN- sylvania sent a letter complimenting my fellow gun scribe Joseph von Benedikt on his article “Getting the Most from Your .30-06” that appeared in the February issue of Shooting Times. Mr. Piper enjoyed Joseph’s focus on extending the “top end” of .30-06 performance but said he’d also like to see more about using America’s favorite rifle cartridge at the other end of the scale: lighter loads for varmints, game hunting, and lower-recoil practice. I am a strong proponent of getting as much time in the field with your big-game rifle as possible. Whether you are target shooting, plinking, or thinning out the varmint population, any extra time with your rifle can improve your ability to put big game in the freezer. I’ve said before that the…

help