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Town & Country

Town & Country

April 2020

Town & Country features the latest in luxury, from beautiful homes, sumptuous dining to exotic locations. In 11 gorgeous annual issues, Town & Country covers the arts, fashion and culture, bringing the best of everything to America's trendsetters

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Hearst
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SUSCRIBIRSE
US$ 19,99
10 Números

En este número

1 min.
t&c history

1978 A LIFE IN MOTION Ruth and Leonard Horwich, longtime fixtures in Chicago society, were avid collectors of art—in particular, works by Alexander Calder. (Ruth was photographed for T&C in her living room surrounded by the artist’s signature mobiles.) In 1967 the Horwiches helped found Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art, and after Leonard died Ruth donated 15 Calders to its collection. Ruth, who died in 2014, told T&C she “never feels alone surrounded by the art she loves.” (More stories about Calder can be found in a new biography out this month; see page 53.)…

2 min.
it’s still here

In another time and place, it might have been torn down in favor of some colonnaded McMansion, but Château de Chantilly survived. Its last owner, Henri d’Orléans, son of the last king of France, knew what to do. One of the great collectors of his time, Henri bequeathed the castle and the artwork in it to the Institut de France in 1886, with two conditions: that the positions of the paintings remain unchanged and that the artwork never leave the château. Next time you’re in Paris, make the 40-minute trip and you’ll see his wish was granted. The Raphael and the Ingres can attest to it. As can I. During the September fashion shows I snuck away for a dinner hosted by Friends of the Domaine de Chantilly, co-chaired by Katharine…

1 min.
#very t&c

TRUE Prep The dress was everywhere: a slim sheath in vibrant patterns, often with white trim to show off that tan. From Palm Beach to Greenwich, “the Lilly” was a uniform for the barefoot, sun-kissed socialites of the 1960s and ’70s. It was resort wear with a twist—colorful splashes of hibiscus and azaleas, or even monkeys sipping martinis and lions playing guitars. Few knew that Lilly Pulitzer herself was not responsible for the prints; for two decades textile designer Suzie Zuzek created more than 1,500 of Pulitzer’s patterns. This May, Zuzek’s archives are being exhibited for the first time, at the Cooper Hewitt in New York (including the pattern seen here). So go now, into your closet—or your mother’s, or grand-mother’s—find that Lilly, and remember: It’s always summer somewhere. DON PENNY, STYLED…

6 min.
the loan rangers

Justin Wine can afford to buy an apartment. But when the founder of Aspen Wealth Management decided recently to put down roots in Tribeca—the richest zip code in Manhattan—he didn’t buy one of the neighborhood’s sought-after lofts. Instead he decided to rent. “When you factor in a 25 percent down payment, taxes, and maintenance fees, renting just makes more sense,” says Wine, whose firm specializes in supervising family wealth. “With the stock market doing so well, my portfolio is outperforming my rent, while I keep my money liquid and nimble.” He isn’t alone; according to the brokerage firm CORE, the number of Manhattan homes that rent for more than $10,000 per month increased by 20 percent in the past year—roughly the same amount that sales have fallen. Additionally, CORE reports that the…

2 min.
everyone has read this book

Anglophiles who have been gorging themselves on Harry and Meghan gossip have a new story to devour: Anne Glenconner’s memoir, Lady in Waiting: My Extraordinary Life in the Shadow of the Crown. Though it’s being published in the U.S. on March 24, it was released in the UK in October—right before season three of The Crown, in which Nancy Carroll portrays Glenconner, a lady in waiting to Helena Bonham Carter’s Princess Margaret—and aristocrats on both sides of the pond started passing around copies faster than the latest meme. Rare book seller Kinsey Marable imported copies to the U.S. in December and announced it on Instagram. He sold out in two days. Glenconner, Roddy Llewellyn, for Bianca and Mick Jagger’s vacations on Mustique (owned by Glenconner’s husband), and for other blueblooded…

2 min.
the t&c master plan

“It was truly one of the best weddings we’ve done in 20 years.” Coming from event planner extraordinaire Bronson van Wyck—who has thrown parties for the Obamas, Madonna, and Beyoncé, to name just a few clients—that means something. Over the Fourth of July weekend last year, Julia Dean, a Columbia Business School student, and Matthew Karle, who works in private equity, were married at Badminton House, the grand Grade I–listed estate of the Duke of Beaufort in the countryside near Bath, England. The New York–based couple chose a destination wedding, thinking the distance would make it an intimate 150-person affair. But too many friends were eager to celebrate, and the guest list ballooned to 320, including several of the bride’s parents’ friends, among them Jill Kargman, Tory Burch and Pierre-Yves Roussel,…