menu
close
search
EXPLORARMI BIBLIOTECAREVISTAS
CATEGORÍAS
DESTACADOS
EXPLORARMI BIBLIOTECA
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Deportes
Transworld SnowboardingTransworld Snowboarding

Transworld Snowboarding Gear Guide 2016

TransWorld SNOWboarding inspires and motivates you to go out and ride. Delivers on everything from the best photos of the world's best riders, to product reviews, how to's, and park and resort info.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
American Media Operations, Inc
Leer Máskeyboard_arrow_down

EN ESTE NÚMERO

access_time1 min.
framed

BASICS This is just a small roller on photographer Silvano Zeiter’s home mountain of Aletsch, Switzerland. There’s not much to it, only a “warm up” spot for Jake Blauvelt and Nicolas Müller here. But damn if this doesn’t make you want to be there. Snowboarding isn’t always about chasing that huge AK descent or hitting the biggest cheese wedge ever. If you’re lucky, those things may be part of your journey while standing sideways, but most of the time all you need is a friend or two, good gear, and a bit of simple terrain. A bluebird day and some blower pow helps too. OLD FAITHFUL Among many board designers, there’s a feeling that this is a golden era for experimentation. The rocker revolution has had its day and people are looking for…

access_time3 min.
the next ascent

I was sitting on a buttery leather couch in the Alta Lakes Observatory—a 40-year-old log cabin on the backside of Telluride perched at 11,300 feet. The scene was straight out of a luxury resort TV commercial with wrought iron handrails, a mine tram bull-wheel for a window frame, and a man with a chef hat carefully prepping fresh veggie wraps and steak sandwiches with flaky bread. It was a cushy press trip and there wasn’t much to be pissed off about, but as I peered over the shoulder of a world-renowned backcountry guide flipping through a ski magazine’s “Buyer‘s Guide,” he threw it down on the heavy wooden coffee table in disgust. “When they start filling it up with all this marketing fluff crap, I don’t want to read any of…

access_time3 min.
the case for building a quiver

“You’re more engaged with your equipment rather than riding the exact same board, which is an extension of you.” Five seasons ago, Austin Smith returned from Japan, where he’d noticed a bunch of oddly shaped, surfy-looking boards. Fueled by envy of the different shapes, he built his own deck in a buddy’s garage in Bend, Oregon. In 2012, he teamed up with Bryan Fox and the pair used Smith’s homemade template to create a wide, 154-centimeter swallowtail, which would become the first deck in Nitro’s Quiver line along with a twin rail board and a directional all-mountain board. The reason, Smith says, is that both he and Fox liked to ride a variety of terrain and didn’t feel like one board could maximize all those different disciplines or conditions. There’s since been…

access_time3 min.
bringing the ship home

“It’s rare for any American compay, especially a snowboard brand, to cut ties with all factories in China and reset their production stateside...” Most epiphanies occur in a still moment of reflection—in the shower, shavasana of a yoga class, or riding the chair lift at Loveland Ski Area with an old friend. The latter is where Sims’ Marc Vitelli and Never Summer’s Chris Harris hatched their plan to bring the Sims operation back to America. Available the first week of November, Sims will release two retro-inspired boards built in Never Summer’s 26,000 square-foot factory in Denver. The Blade is an all-mountain freerider and the Juice is a freestyle true twin. They’ll retail for 520 dollars and 510 dollars, respectively, and both will have three-year warranties. To recreate the throwback graphics for the Blade,…

access_time2 min.
tested + approved

TESTING OVER 250 BOOTS, BINDINGS, GOGGLES, GLOVES, HELMETS, AND OTHER ACCESSORIES IN EVERY SNOWY CORNER OF THE COUNTRY WAS A MASSIVE UNDERTAKING THAT THE TRANSWORLD STAFF COULDN’T HANDLE ALONE. TO HELP SHOULDER THE DELIGHTFUL BURDEN OF RIDING THE LATEST AND MOST PREMIUM SNOWBOARD GEAR DAY AFTER DAY, WE ENLISTED THE HELP OF EXPERIENCED GEAR TESTERS AND WRITERS TO TRANSLATE THE NUANCES OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES INTO CRITICAL, THOUGHTFUL REVIEWS. MUCH LIKE OUR GOOD WOOD AWARDS, THE NEW TESTED + APPROVED SECTION ONLY FEATURES THE TOP PERFORMING GEAR IN EACH CATEGORY. WE KNOW THAT EVEN THE BEST PRODUCTS HAVE PERKS AND QUIRKS, SO WE PULLED THOSE OUT TO HIGHLIGHT IN OUR “RAD AND BAD” LINES. THIS IS OUR MOST COMPREHENSIVE TEST TO DATE AND WE HOPE YOU’LL FIND THE HONEST FEEDBACK USEFUL. MIKE…

access_time3 min.
goggles

SHRED Amazify Shnerdwood $180 Our testers gave a resounding two thumbs up to Shred’s Amazify goggles. They earned high praise for unparalleled peripheral vision and strikingly sharp optics even at high altitude, due in part to a small valve that equalizes the pressure between the lenses and the outside. Cylindrical lenses aren’t typically renowned for top-end visual acuity, but the Amazifys defied convention. Fit nicely with several helmet models. Rad: Hydro-repellent foam across the top increases airflow to minimize fogging. Bad: Manual lens-change system took us to Fingerprint City. ANON. M3 $260 Testers experiencing Anon’s magnetic field for the first time said it had the “Wow” factor. The tech applies twofold: Magnets connect lens to frame with suction-like grip and made swapping lenses nearly effortless. Likewise, magnets placed in the bridge of the goggle frame connected seamlessly with an…

help