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Transworld SnowboardingTransworld Snowboarding

Transworld Snowboarding Gear Guide 2017

TransWorld SNOWboarding inspires and motivates you to go out and ride. Delivers on everything from the best photos of the world's best riders, to product reviews, how to's, and park and resort info.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
American Media Operations, Inc
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EN ESTE NÚMERO

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framed

We, as snowboarders, along with our counterparts on concrete and water, are allowed an opportunity to interact with the surfaces in front of, above, and below our feet in a way most traditional pastimes don’t offer. And navigation through snowy topography is, in part, dictated by our equipment. For the first time in a career that spans nearly two decades, Nico’s name is officially stamped on a snowboard. He designed it to charge the terrain he presents it with, and he did a damn good job, which is why you’ll see it again on page 74. Snowboarding, unlike team sports, doesn’t require participation from anybody else. And although snowboarding has the capacity to be enjoyed solo—sometimes even more so than in a group—it’s often most fun with friends. Instead of competing,…

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launch

This issue kicks off our 30th year. TransWorld is the longest-running snowboard magazine in existence, and since 1987, the TWSNOW staff has been traveling the globe in search of turns, testing the latest products along the way. This past year was no exception. In last year’s Gear Guide we introduced Tested + Approved, and since about two days after we sent the files to the press, we have been working on the one in your hands. Over 500 products were tested on snow over the past year by our staff and extensive testing team. A diverse set of paths brought us here, with one major thing in common: We are all in on snowboarding— the turns, the gear, the lifestyle. TransWorld is dedicated to product-related content— so much so that we have…

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bent metal is back and way better

“The graphics were metal, the vibe hesh, the team anarchical. But quality of production— a phrase synonymous with Mervin’s other hardgoods brands, Lib Tech and Gnu — was lacking...” After Bent Metal Larry was fired, he hit rock bottom. He is now, thankfully, in rehab. Larry was the unofficial mascot for Bent Metal, Mervin Manufacturing’s recently relaunched binding brand. Rarely seen and occasionally quoted, Larry was a lurking legend—a method-throwing, cigarette-brandishing Sasquatch of snowboarding. “He wasn’t a real person, but he was real,” lamented team pro and marketing manager Jesse Burtner, who described Larry as “a rocker dude who drove the brand identity.” A longhaired albeit imaginary manifestation of Bent Metal’s aversion to the candy-coated mainstream, Larry gave no fucks. That attitude is what drew riders like Jamie Lynn to the fold. “They didn’t…

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details matter

“You just have to know what you’re looking for to find it.” Snowboard gear has become so accessible it’s easy to neglect putting much thought into the purchase of it. But the market’s been saturated with products to a point where it’s harder than ever to differentiate quality from mediocrity. Thirty years ago, when TransWorld SNOWboarding was born, the product field was narrow. Real narrow. Purchasing a snowboard was simple. If you were this tall and weighed this much, you rode this size board. Three inches shorter, 20 pounds less, and you downsized a few centimeters. Twelve years after inception, TransWorld hosted its first Good Wood board test. Readers were stoked to have help sorting through the choices being sold to them—albeit a much narrower scope of options than what is available…

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tested approved

MIKE HORN Mike Horn’s first backcountry pack had bungee cords for snowboard straps. That’s a far cry from the innovative gear he tested in his Crested Butte backyard this winter. Horn’s been writing about snowboarding for a decade-plus, and he tends to get crusty when reviewing gear that’s not quite up to snuff. DEVIN SILVERTHORNE–LILLIE A New Hampshire transplant, Devin’s Ice Coast roots provide superior edge awareness, and with Breckenridge’s Park Lane in her backyard, she practically falls from bed to her board. She put freestyle bindings on trial in and out of bounds— from frozen mornings to spring slush, backyard rail jams to sidecountry booter sessions. BILLY BROWN Billy Brown covered new tech for this year’s guide. The California native grew up riding the terrain parks in South Lake Tahoe, but for the past…

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men’s freeride bindings

BENT METAL Transfer $290 Who else would build their baseplates with the same construction as a snowboard, right down to the Jamie Lynn artwork on the minitopsheet? The Transfer earned a top spot in the freeride category for its responsiveness, comfort, versatility, and style. Testers railed turns through chop and refrozen snow, praising the binding’s precise, smooth heel-to-toe response even in the nastiest conditions. RAD: Killer combination of response and comfort turned the entire mountain into a park. BAD: Heel cup doesn’t adjust, limiting customization. NOW O-Drive $499 The weight-to-response ratio in the O-Drive bindings is tough to beat, testers said. They ride as light as any bindings on the market, but the responsiveness provided by the tall, wraparound carbon highback is second to none, and testers found a little bit of forward lean goes…

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