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category_outlined / Cultura y Literatura
VietnamVietnam

Vietnam August 2019

Vietnam Magazine Presents the full & true stories from America’s most controversial & divisive war. Vietnam is the only magazine exclusively devoted to telling the full story of the Vietnam war, with gripping firsthand accounts and carefully researched articles by Vietnam war veterans of the conflict and top military historians.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
HistoryNet
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6 Números

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TOPGUN’S LAUNCH On the 50th anniversary of the famed Topgun school for Navy fighter pilots, Dan Pedersen, the pilot who founded the program, explains in this issue how it all began on a base in California. To learn more about the Navy Fighter Weapons School, visit HistoryNet.com and search: “Topgun.” Through firsthand accounts and stunning photos, our website puts you in the field with the troops who fought in one of America’s most controversial wars. HISTORYNET Now Sign up for our FREE monthly e-newsletter at: historynet.com/newsletters Let’s connect Vietnam magazine Go digital Vietnam magazine is available on Zinio, Kindle and Nook.…

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vietnam

HISTORYNET MICHAEL A. REINSTEIN CHAIRMAN & PUBLISHER DAVID STEINHAFEL PUBLISHER ALEX NEILL EDITOR IN CHIEF CHUCK SPRINGSTON EDITOR PARAAG SHUKLA SENIOR EDITOR JERRY MORELOCK SENIOR EDITOR JON GUTTMAN RESEARCH DIRECTOR DAVID T. ZABECKI EDITOR EMERITUS HARRY SUMMERS JR. FOUNDING EDITOR STEPHEN KAMIFUJI CREATIVE DIRECTOR BRIAN WALKER GROUP ART DIRECTOR JON C. BOCK ART DIRECTOR MELISSA A. WINN DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY GUY ACETO PHOTO EDITOR ADVISORY BOARD JOE GALLOWAY, ROBERT H. LARSON, BARRY McCAFFREY, JAMES R. RECKNER, CARL O. SCHUSTER, EARL H. TILFORD JR., SPENCER C. TUCKER, ERIK VILLARD, JAMES H. WILLBANKS CORPORATE DOUG NEIMAN CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER ROB WILKINS DIRECTOR OF PARTNERSHIP MARKETING TOM GRIFFITHS CORPORATE DEVELOPMENT GRAYDON SHEINBERG CORPORATE DEVELOPMENT ADVERTISING MORTON GREENBERG SVP Advertising Sales mgreenberg@mco.com COURTNEY FORTUNE Advertising Services cfortune@historynet.com RICK GOWER Regional Sales Manager rick@rickgower.com TERRY JENKINS Regional Sales Manager tjenkins@historynet.com DIRECT RESPONSE ADVERTISING MEDIA PEOPLE / NANCY FORMAN 212-779-7172 ext. 224 nforman@mediapeople.com…

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Hamburger Hill and Nixon’s Plan James Wright wrote (“The Capture of Hamburger Hill,” June 2019) that “Nixon promised that he had a secret plan to end the war.” That is one of the myths of the war. It was started by one reporter misinterpreting a Nixon campaign speech. Nixon never said that. Other than that, I commend Mr. Wright on an excellent article. Lenny RodinForest Hills, N.Y. James Wright replies: Mr. Rodin is correct. Richard Nixon did not say on the record that he had a “secret” plan. In background sessions with reporters and editorial boards in 1968 he spoke in general terms about his Vietnam strategy—to engage the Soviets to help end the war and to reduce American combat involvement. He did say that if he discussed his plans publicly it would “weaken…

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u.s.-vietnam project cleans toxins from da nang airport

An area that was once hotly contested during the war became an area of cooperation as Vietnamese and Americans cleaned up a different kind of “hot spot,” one created by the toxic chemical dioxin, a component of herbicide Agent Orange. Vietnam and the United States, in a joint project at Da Nang airport, have cleansed 74 acres that were contaminated by dioxin, the Associated Press reported. “It is proof that we are opening a future of good cooperation between the governments of Vietnam and the United States,” Vice Defense Minister Nguyen Chi Vinh said, adding that “Da Nang people can be assured that their health will not be destroyed by chemicals left over from the war.” U.S. Ambassador Daniel Kritenbrink said the Da Nang cleanup showed the potential for future partnerships. “This project truly…

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civilians exposed to agent orange stateside

During the Vietnam War, U.S. troops in Vietnam weren’t the only Americans exposed to Agent Orange. So were civilians working at Eglin Air Force Base in the Florida Panhandle, according to a podcast from Northern California Public Media. The herbicide, sprayed by air over South Vietnam in areas with suspected Viet Cong soldiers, was tested at Eglin in the 1960s, and workers involved in the testing are experiencing serious health problems typical of Agent Orange exposure. Stories of individual workers affected by the exposure are told in “The Forgotten Civilians of Eglin Air Force Base,” an episode of Northern California Public Media’s “Living Downstream: The Environmental Justice Podcast.” Workers interviewed by reporter Jon Kalish included a man who filmed the sprayings and another who picked up pieces of cardboard sprayed with the chemical…

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victory for blue water navy vets

After years of fighting efforts to extend Agent Orange benefits to more Vietnam War Navy veterans, the Department of Veterans Affairs has given up. The VA will not ask the U.S. Justice Department to appeal a federal court ruling that said sailors in the Blue Water Navy—those who served on ocean-going ships anchored off the South Vietnamese coast—are eligible for the same Agent Orange disability benefits provided to other Vietnam veterans, Military Times reported. Veterans who served on the ground in Vietnam or were in the Brown Water Navy, manning boats on inland rivers, don’t have to prove exposure to Agent Orange to gain the disability benefits. They are presumed to have been exposed to the toxic chemical. That same presumption didn’t apply to blue water vets, who had to prove exposure. But…

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