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category_outlined / Art & Architecture
Architectural DigestArchitectural Digest

Architectural Digest July/August 2019

Architectural Digest is the world's foremost design authority, showcasing the work of top architects and interior decorators. It continues to set new benchmarks for how to live well—what to buy, what to see and do, where to travel, and who to watch on the fast-paced, multifaceted global design scene.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Conde Nast US
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11 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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architectural digest

EDITOR IN CHIEF Amy Astley CREATIVE DIRECTOR David Sebbah EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, DIGITAL Keith Pollock EDITORIAL OPERATIONS DIRECTOR Diane Dragan EXECUTIVE EDITOR Shax Riegler FEATURES DIRECTOR Sam Cochran INTERIORS & GARDEN DIRECTOR Alison Levasseur STYLE DIRECTOR Jane Keltner de Valle DECORATIVE ARTS EDITOR Mitchell Owens WEST COAST EDITOR Mayer Rus FEATURES SENIOR DESIGN EDITOR Hannah Martin DEPUTY DIRECTOR, DIGITAL Kristen Flanagan SPECIAL PROJECTS DIRECTOR, DIGITAL Sydney Wasserman ENTERTAINMENT DIRECTOR Dana Mathews EXECUTIVE FEATURES EDITOR David Foxley CLEVER EDITOR Lindsey Mather FEATURES EDITOR, DIGITAL Nick Mafi ASSOCIATE ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR Rachel Wallace ASSOCIATE CLEVER EDITOR Zoë Sessums ASSISTANT EDITORS Elizabeth Fazzare, Katherine McGrath (Digital), Carly Olson ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR IN CHIEF Gabriela Ulloa MARKET MARKET EDITOR Madeline O’Malley AD PRO EDITOR Katherine Burns Olson DEPUTY EDITOR Allie Weiss SENIOR STYLE & MARKET EDITOR Benjamin Reynaert FEATURES EDITOR Anna Fixsen NEWS EDITOR Madeleine Luckel REGIONAL NEWS EDITOR Tim Latterner ASSOCIATE VISUALS EDITOR Gabrielle Pilotti Langdon ASSOCIATE EDITOR Mel…

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editor’s letter

“I was inspired by Japanese architecture and minimalist aesthetics…. For me, uncluttered means healthy. If you don’t use something, you don’t need it.” —Maria Sharapova The question I am most often asked about my work is “How do you find the housesAD shoots?” Well, finding them is the job! We unearth exceptional houses via a vast network of contacts with architects, interior designers, and notables in every profession and industry from art and fashion to entertainment and sports. Which brings us to Maria Sharapova, whom I first met 12 years ago when she did a cover shoot for Teen Vogue, the magazine I founded. Maria was only 19 but preternaturally mature and poised, with flawless manners. I found her impressive and unforgettable—a true champion. Now 32, Maria is often out and…

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magic mushrooms

Glamorous Milanese designer Gabriella Crespi contemplated an age-old decorating dilemma in the mid-1970s: How could she bring the restorative warmth of the sun indoors? Her answer came in the form of Rising Sun, a radiant lighting collection made from an unusual pair of materials: brass and bamboo. The latter, she observed, “combines force and flexibility, the warmth of color and a capacity to let light through.” Of Rising Sun’s rare designs—few were ever produced—one has recently proliferated: the Fungo lamp, which features a swooping brass base and bamboo shade that gives it a mushroom-like silhouette. The lamp “embodies Crespi’s talent to produce objects of great perfection,” says agenda-setting dealer Nina Yashar, who showed an original Fungo alongside other Rising Sun pieces at Nilufar gallery (nilufar.com), her Milan showroom, in April. “It is…

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soft landing

When Cardinal Tolomeo Gallio commissioned architect Pellegrino Tibaldi to build a Lake Como retreat in the mid–16th century, the result was a summer house to rival all others: the sprawling Renaissance residence later christened Villa d’Este, on the coast of Cernobbio. Gallio would inhabit it for only 20 days, but the property (reborn as a hotel in 1873) has since become the go-to getaway for politicians, intellectuals, and style setters, among them the Loro Piana family of Italian cashmere fame. So when one of the grounds’ four private villas, the 1815 Villa Cima, found itself in need of a refresh, the hotel turned to Loro Piana to work its magic. The strategy was simple: Out with the old and in with the new. Unveiled this past spring, the airy update replaced…

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blooming genius

Long used by residents in ad hoc fashion, one particular empty lot in the Bronx’s Morrisania neighborhood had “always been a magnet,” says Bette Midler, the founder of the New York Restoration Project, the green-space organization that has been revitalizing woebegone urban plots since 1995. Today, thanks to the NYRP, that unprepossessing acreage is now Fannie’s Garden at Paradise on Earth, a 13,000-square-foot public living room. Children can grow vegetables on the trapezoidal parcel, and families can barbecue. A pavilion awaits a complement of solar panels, which will soon allow people to charge smartphones. A deck on the lawn hosts graduation ceremonies (C.S. 150, an elementary school, sits directly across the street) and film nights, and storm water is collected and channeled to irrigate the rain garden. Of the 36 raised…

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good nature

When searching for inspiration, ceramic artist Makoto Kagoshima turns to flowers. From their brilliant blooms to their curlicue tendrils, everything about them fascinates him. “I am always mesmerized by the intricate sense of purpose I observe within the natural world,” Kagoshima says. “I draw flowers in anticipation of those who will behold them.” Based in the southern Japanese city of Fukuoka, Kagoshima has honed his spirited breed of earthenware for more than 15 years, developing fresh twists on traditional techniques. He applies his botanical motifs using a wax-resist glazing method called rounuki, adding texture to the clay with the kakiotoshi etching process. Painted designs—done at various stages of the firing process, depending on the desired effect—are applied freehand, often in exuberant pastels. For some pieces, he creates cheerfully hued underglazes using…

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