menu
close
search
EXPLOREMY LIBRARYMAGAZINES
CATEGORIES
FEATURED
EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Art & Architecture
Architectural DigestArchitectural Digest

Architectural Digest February 2017

Architectural Digest is the world's foremost design authority, showcasing the work of top architects and interior decorators. It continues to set new benchmarks for how to live well—what to buy, what to see and do, where to travel, and who to watch on the fast-paced, multifaceted global design scene.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Conde Nast US
Read Morekeyboard_arrow_down
SPECIAL: Save 40% on your subscription!
SUBSCRIBE
$29.99$17.99
11 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
hot seat

When Swiss architect Pierre Jeanneret devised a teak-and-cane chair in the 1950s, his reasoning was simple: The people needed seats. The design was just one of several by Jeanneret that would be produced by the thousands for Chandigarh, India, the utopian city created by his cousin Le Corbusier. The chair’s V-shaped legs, hewn from humidity- and bug-resistant Burma teak by local artisans, were sturdy. And their durability would be put to the test decades later in Chandigarh, when, as people gravitated to more contemporary designs, discarded Jeanneret chairs piled up across the city—from the roof of the High Court to the balconies of administrative buildings. Many were sold as scrap at local auctions for a few rupees. Enter: the dealers. In the early aughts, Eric Touchaleaume of Galerie 54, François Laffanour, Philippe…

access_time1 min.
demisch danant

SPECIALTY: Twentieth-century French design, mostly from the 1950s to the ’70s. BEST KNOWN FOR: Highlighting stylemakers who have gone off the radar—such as ’60s cult figure Maria Pergay, whom Suzanne Demisch tracked down in Morocco in 2004, using the yellow pages. RESEARCH AID: Back issues of Connaissance des Arts, Maison & Jardin, Maison Française, and Plaisir de France. VIRTUE: Patience. “With Joseph-André Motte, it took seven years of talking with his family before they gave me access to his archives,” Stephane Danant says. “Then I spent another year making weekly visits to his widow to document the images.” LATEST PURSUIT: Postwar talent Étienne Fermigier. “He was so prolific, creating everything from lighting and furniture to cars,” Demisch says. “But there’s not a lot around.” LUCKY FIND: A rare Pierre Paulin Élysée bookcase, modular Plexiglas shelving…

access_time1 min.
whirlwind

1. JOHN DERIAN FOR ASTIER DE VILLATTE SMALL RED, BLUE, AND YELLOW MARBLE TERRA-COTTA TEAPOT. 5" H. X 8" W. X 4" DIA.; $575. JOHNDERIAN.COM, 212-677-3917 2. LE FANION JASPÉ EARTHENWARE EGG CUP. 2.25" H.; $36. LEFANION.COM, 212-463-8760 3. REBECCA ATWOOD DESIGNS MARBLE WALLPAPER IN OCEAN; $68/YARD. REBECCAATWOOD-.COM, 718-369-0016 4. PORTA ROMANA ROCKET TABLE LAMP IN FRENCH BRASS WITH SATIN SHADE IN MARBLE. 27.5" H. X 13" W.; $2,511 FOR LAMP AND SHADE. PORTAROMANA.COM, 786-464-0992 5. TROELS FLENSTED STUDIO LARGE POURED BOWL IN WHITE WITH PINK. 2.25" H. X 7.5" DIA.; $185. TROELSFLENSTED. COM, +45-60-65-58-98 6. RULE OF THREE STONE PLUME SILKAND-LINEN PILLOW IN STARLIGHT NIGHT. 16" X 20"; $315. RULEOFTHREESTUDIO. COM, 213-266-8643 1. COURTESY OF SCHUMACHER; 2. COURTESY OF TISCH NEW YORK; 3. JOHN MANNO. 1. COURTESY OF JOHN DERIAN CO.; 2. AND 5. JOHN…

access_time3 min.
provocative statements

At first glance, the through line of Adam McEwen’s art appears to be humor—of the deadpan variety often associated with Brits like himself. There are his parodies of shop-window signs, such as the one announcing “Fuck Off We’re Closed,” which he made shortly after moving to New York in 2000, and his pitch-perfect obituaries for subjects who are still alive. There are his drawings of real text messages (one reads, “Cant. Dad’s shooting a porno in ohio, mom’s flying to seattle”) and his photographs, printed on colored kitchen sponges, of chewing gum stomped and baked into sidewalks. But take another look, and something darker, more unsettling surfaces. Those wads of gum in fact reference bombing patterns from the Second World War. Graphite sculptures of everyday objects, meanwhile, may look hyperreal, only…

access_time2 min.
margherita missoni

Margherita Maccapani Missoni Amos grew up in a swirl—okay, make that a zigzag— of color and pattern. “I don’t have to consciously put it out there,” she says. “It’s part of my aesthetic. It’s how I dress myself, my kids, my home.” Now she’s making it her business to spread the rainbow: The Italy-based mother of two boys launched a childrenswear line, Margherita Kids, two years ago, and will debut a home collection for Pottery Barn Kids in January. Needless to say, the collaboration is a reflection of her vibrant world. Featuring a sophisticated medley of sunshine hues that defy gender distinction (no pink or blue themes here), the line has a playful, free-spirited feel. Think mirrors trimmed in daisy petals (the flower Amos is named for) and Calder-esque mobiles.…

access_time3 min.
out of the ordinary

At age five Diane Cheatham already had it all worked out: Instead of pretending to be a doctor or a cop, she played developer, assigning subcontracting jobs to her pint-size colleagues as they dreamed up houses. The instinct lay dormant through her early career as a CPA but surfaced when she later started to work in a developer’s office. Then, at 40, she struck out on her own building homes—all of them modernist. In 2005, with some 60 houses under her belt, Diane set about creating an entire neighborhood in Dallas, on an overgrown 14-acre property in the northeast part of the city. She and her husband, Chuck Cheatham, a financial executive, made a deal, mostly with each other. Diane would sell 50 lots carved from the site, which they called…

help