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category_outlined / Art & Architecture
Architectural DigestArchitectural Digest

Architectural Digest January 2017

Architectural Digest is the world's foremost design authority, showcasing the work of top architects and interior decorators. It continues to set new benchmarks for how to live well—what to buy, what to see and do, where to travel, and who to watch on the fast-paced, multifaceted global design scene.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Conde Nast US
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11 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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ad100

In an industry as rich with talent as the design world, it is indeed very difficult for me and the editors of Architectural Digest to single out only 100 people (or firms) for inclusion in our yearly list honoring the best of the best. One hundred is certainly not enough to celebrate everyone of note, but perhaps it is the right number to make landing on the list a real achievement. We agonize over the AD100 precisely because we realize how meaningful it is to the professionals who are on it and to the readers who trust it to guide them in their own design education and personal choices. This year we incorporate, for the first time, landscape designers as well as introduce a Hall of Fame, which enables us…

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frankly speaking

Josef Frank, the Austrian-born Swedish architect and designer, never believed that a house was a machine for living. “It doesn’t matter if you mix old and new, or different styles, colors, and patterns,” he advised in 1958. “The things you like will always blend, by themselves, into a peaceful whole.” Though not a star like Le Corbusier or Mies van der Rohe, Frank thrilled with his furniture, lighting, and textiles for Stockholm retailer Svenskt Tenn. But it’s the fabrics (check out “Josef Frank: Patterns—Furniture—Painting” at London’s Fashion and Textile Museum through May 7) that have won him cult status. “The freer the pattern, the better,” Frank said of his high-wire creations, dense with flowers, fruits, birds, mountains, and waterways in surreal color combinations. The designer’s printed linens are “imaginative and sometimes beautifully…

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juan garcia mosqueda

CONCEPT: Progressive art and design under one roof. CREDENTIALS: Juan Garcia Mosqueda cut his teeth at legendary design mecca Moss and in the architecture and design department at MoMA. HOW IT WORKS: Each year Garcia Mosqueda collaborates with a different talent to assemble a collection of furniture, objects, and artworks. His roster thus far has included Studio Job, Andrew Zuckerman, and Matylda Krzykowski. “It’s once I get inside someone’s home or studio that I realize they’ll be an amazing curator.” MANTRA: “There’s more than one way of looking at art and design.” HE’S WATCHING: “Architects like SO-IL, interactional designers like Dunne & Raby, and more traditional talents like Kwangho Lee, Azuma Makoto, and Jelle Mastenbroek.” QUICKEST SELL: A powder-blue Joe Colombo Elda armchair from Studio Job’s Collection #1. “You can’t usually find them in that…

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no limits

CHAIR: COURTESY OF MAX LAMB AND JOHNSON TRADING GALLERY; RUG: COURTESY OF CC-TAPIS; SIDEBOARD: FABRIZIO ANNIBALI; CANDLEHOLDER: COURTESY OF ARIK LEVY AND GAIA & GINO; CONSOLE: COURTESY OF HERVÉ VAN DER STRAETEN/RALPH PUCCI; ARMCHAIR: FERNANDO LASZLO/COURTESY OF FRIEDMAN BENDA AND ESTUDIO CAMPANA. TAPE DISPENSER: COURTESY OF PUIFORCAT; MIRROR: COURTESY OF CASSINA; LAMP: COURTESY OF MARCIN RUSAK STUDIO; STOOL: COURTESY OF LOUIS VUITTON MALLETIER; PITCHER: ERIK & PETRA HESMERG; CHEST: COURTESY OF DAVID GILL GALLERY…

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cristina celestino

For Milan-based designer Cristina Celestino, humor—in addition to beauty—lies in the details. “There’s always a touch of irony,” she says of her work, in which a mane of colorful fringe, the unexpected shape of an earring back, or coils of passementerie deliver jolts of fun to modern silhouettes. Celestino, who studied architecture at the Università Iuav di Venezia and launched her own design practice, Attico, in 2009, has now teamed up with Fendi for a fizzy collection of furnishings that made its debut at Design Miami. She started this project, like most of her others, in the library, leafing through design books on the likes of Paolo Venini, Guglielmo Ulrich, Carlo Scarpa, and Le Corbusier. It was Italian architect Gio Ponti’s Villa Planchart that ultimately caught her eye. “It is a hymn…

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light his fire

TIP 1: ACE YOUR ANDIRONS “I love andirons, especially funny or amusing ones,” says decorator Jacques Grange, pictured at his home in Paris. His fireplace here is accented with vintage dog andirons by Armand Albert Rateau; at his beach house in Portugal, the andirons take the shape of ducks. Jacques Grange, the Paris decorator, does great mantels. “Fireplaces give focus to a room and add a voluptuous quality,” he says. “You burn the wood, see the flames, and feel the warmth.” So, he reasons, those crackling logs should be framed in ways that emphasize their seductions. “I love mantels with a sense of poésie, sensualité, and fantaisie.” Consider the gutsy 1930s-inspired example, encrusted with silvery mica, that Grange installed in Christian Dior exec Mathilde Favier-Meyer’s Paris salon. For collectors Jacqueline and Mortimer…

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