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category_outlined / Art & Architecture
Architectural DigestArchitectural Digest

Architectural Digest July-August 2018

Architectural Digest is the world's foremost design authority, showcasing the work of top architects and interior decorators. It continues to set new benchmarks for how to live well—what to buy, what to see and do, where to travel, and who to watch on the fast-paced, multifaceted global design scene.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Conde Nast US
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11 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
editor’s letter

“This house signifies the next chapter of my life—as an adult, a woman, and a performer. I was able to pour all of who I am into making this place.”—Mandy Moore It seems fitting that we ring in the Fourth of July and this high-summer double issue of AD with a feature on a resuscitated and refreshed Pasadena house that our Mayer Rus aptly describes as “a declaration of independence.” Cover star Mandy Moore, a onetime teen idol, bought a “starter house” in 2002 at the tender age of 18 and admits that “it never felt wholly mine…. I never felt secure enough to bring a lot of people there.” Sixteen years later, Moore has a hit television show (This Is Us), a fiancé, and a spectacular new “old” place to…

access_time2 min.
vegging out

When architects Eva and Nils Koppel asked Danish luminary Poul Henningsen to design the lighting for a buzzy restaurant in Copenhagen’s Langelinie waterfront park in 1958, Henningsen revisited a radical design that he had abandoned more than 30 years prior: a ceiling light that resembled an upside-down artichoke. Just three months later, five finished versions (made by lighting manufacturer Louis Poulsen) were installed in Langelinie Pavilion. The designs—each of which used 72 copper leaves to totally conceal the lightbulb—diffused a warm luminescence that, thanks to the pale-pink paint applied to the underside of the leaves, gave diners below a healthy, rosy glow. “The fact that you couldn’t see the light source was very revolutionary,” says Rasmus Markholdt, product and design director of Louis Poulsen. “At the time, people didn’t see a lamp…

access_time3 min.
grass roots

A cabin nestled amid the counterculture enclave that birthed Woodstock is not the first place you would expect to find the très cool Sarah Andelman, cofounder of Paris’s late, lamented concept store Colette. (She now heads up Just an Idea, a consulting company.) Yet, here in the quiet New York hamlet of Chichester, the Parisian is clipping thyme in her garden outside the cottages she shares with her American husband, music-video director Philip Andelman, and their son, Woody. Though their main residence is in France, they retreat here for summers and vacations. In fact, Woody’s name is a testament to this very place. Rewind 12 years, when a then-single Philip decamped from Los Angeles and wound up in the Catskills (where, by his account, “everyone has a recording studio”). In the summer…

access_time1 min.
jungle boogie

Oscar-winning design deity Catherine Martin (Moulin Rouge!, The Great Gatsby), a.k.a. Mrs. Baz Luhrmann, thrills to what she calls the big, “discordant” mix. Enter Majorelle, her bodacious new range of textiles, wallpapers, and trims for Mokum. Think palm fronds, bunches of ripe bananas, leopard spots, and rampant Orientalism, sparked, in part, by Morocco’s swoony Jardin Majorelle. jamesdunloptextiles.com 1. & 2. COURTESY OF MOKUM; 3. EMILY ANDREWS…

access_time1 min.
curtain call

SINCE OPENING IN 1900, Boston’s Emerson Colonial Theatre has launched some of America’s most-beloved musicals, from Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Oklahoma! to Sondheim’s Follies. And for decades it had an interior to match. Conceived by architect Clarence H. Blackall and designer Henry Barrett Pennell, the theater brought the best of Baroque Europe under one roof, reproducing elements of Versailles and the Louvre. But by the time Ambassador Theatre Group (ATG) won its management in 2017, trend-based renovations had altered Blackall’s intent. “We had to revive that feeling of grandeur,” reflects David Manfredi of Elkus Manfredi Architects, which collaborated with ATG and a team of artisans on a two-year restoration. The results debuted June 27 with the premiere of Moulin Rouge! The Musical. Orchestra seating was replaced, carpet custom-made, gilding refreshed, and…

access_time3 min.
the next big things

When the design studio Charlap Hyman & Herrero approached Patterson Flynn Martin last year, all they had in mind was a single rug for a residential project. But Dara Caponigro—creative director of F. Schumacher & Co., the carpet company’s parent brand—loved the young firm’s energy and asked for more. What was originally meant to be a capsule collection quickly expanded into seven rugs and seven wallpaper patterns, three available as fabrics. “We got to do so many things,” exclaims Adam Charlap Hyman, who cofounded the interdisciplinary studio with Andre Herrero in 2014. (Adam’s younger brother, Alexander, joined their ranks a year later.) Adds Adam, still in a state of disbelief: “It was crazy.” We’d call it shrewd on Schumacher’s part. Wise beyond their 20­-something years, Adam, Andre, and Alexander have quickly…

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