menu
close
search
EXPLOREMY LIBRARYMAGAZINES
CATEGORIES
FEATURED
EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Art & Architecture
Architectural DigestArchitectural Digest

Architectural Digest May 2017

Architectural Digest is the world's foremost design authority, showcasing the work of top architects and interior decorators. It continues to set new benchmarks for how to live well—what to buy, what to see and do, where to travel, and who to watch on the fast-paced, multifaceted global design scene.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Conde Nast US
Read Morekeyboard_arrow_down
SUBSCRIBE
$29.99
11 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
editor’s letter

“Travel makes one modest. You see what a tiny place you occupy in the world.” —Gustave Flaubert Philosophically speaking, who would argue with the great author? But allowing that our metaphysical footprint is tiny, the decorator in my soul insists that the literal space we occupy can certainly pack a massive punch, no matter how minuscule in the grander scheme of the universe. In this special travel issue our subjects live large in far-flung locales such as Lebanon, Sicily, Buenos Aires, and beyond. Each house represents an escape fantasy of its owner, from the grass-roofed architectural marvel gracing our cover that shelters the world-class ponies of polo champion Nacho Figueras in Argentina, to the airy indoor/outdoor “vacation vibe” abodes we visit on Patmos and Bali. Sometimes we travel to feel at…

access_time1 min.
talk to the hand

When artist Pedro Friedeberg’s mentor—the painter and sculptor Mathias Goeritz—left Mexico City for a vacation in 1962, he asked the young Surrealist a favor: Give a favorite local carpenter some work. “I told him to make a hand,” Friedeberg remembers. “Then I said, ‘Why don’t you make it big enough to sit on.’ I thought that would be funny.” When Goeritz returned, he and Manhattan dealer Georges Keller asked to see what Friedeberg had been up to. “Georges told me, ‘These are wonderful! I want two for New York, two for Switzerland, and two more for Paris.’ ” Since then Friedeberg’s chair has been realized in silver, gold leaf, and plastic, and a handful of them aged to resemble Italian baroque relics. And the design world still gives them a round of…

access_time1 min.
galerie kreo

SPECIALTY: Led by husband-and-wife Clémence and Didier Krzentowski (far left), Galerie Kreo specializes in postwar French and Italian design and commissions limited-edition works from contemporary talents. PHILOSOPHY: “We’re like movie producers,” Clémence says. “We create the stories designers want to tell.” INNER CIRCLE: Marc Newson, Konstantin Grcic, Bouroullec brothers, Hella Jongerius. RARE FIND: “For a long time I was looking for a colorful wall light by Gino Sarfatti that I saw on a cover of Domus from 1952,” says Didier, whose book, The Complete Designers’ Lights, takes an encyclopedic approach to postwar lighting. “In 2008, I found one in Germany. It was the missing piece.” WATCHING: Dutch designer Wieki Somers, French talent Jean- Baptiste Fastrez, and Icelandic wunderkind Brynjar Siguroarson. NEXT GENERATION: “We’re on the jury for the Villa Noailles exhibition space in Hyères, France,…

access_time2 min.
top of the lake

When it comes to the world's top villas, what separates the good from the remarkable? In the case of Villa Passalacqua, located on a hill above the western shore of Italy's Lake Como, it's the way the property's 300 years of heritage combine with modern amenities to make for a multilayered destination. In the 1700s, a papal family gave some Lake Como property to Count Passalacqua, who hired famed Swiss architect Felice Soave to build him a 30,000-square foot villa. For decades, the villa hosted the celebrities of the moment, including opera composer Vincenzo Bellini (creator of masterpieces like La Sonnambula and Norma, written while he stayed there) and Napoleon Bonaparte. Beneath the facade's stucco cladding are layers of ancient local stone that are thick enough to keep the interior cool, even…

access_time1 min.
inside out

The all-new Alfa Romeo Giulia is a study in balance, honoring the brand's heritage while adopting many layers of cutting-edge technology. Many of the car's innvovations can't be seen, but are viscerally experienced as soon as you press the raceinspired start button. Between the Nappa leather front seats is the DNA Drive Mode Selector: N for Natural optimizes shift positions, braking and engine for everyday driving. A is for Advanced Efficiency, which biases settings to be more ecofriendly. D for Dynamic is where the Giulia's Italian racing pedigree becomes instantly apparent. The car's heart is an allaluminum, turbo-charged 4-cylinder, with an astonishing 280 hp. That explains the hurry as it hits 60 mph in just 5.1 seconds and tops out at 149 mph. With speed like that, brakes are important, and…

access_time2 min.
magic carpets

Just outside Parsipur, in a tiny village near Varanasi, India, artisans are weaving electric-purple sheep’s wool into the shape of a wild-eyed dodo bird. “It just seems like this Alice in Wonderland fantasy creature,” says designer Simon Haas of the extinct species. “The rugs are so finely made but totally wacko.” The Haas Brothers are two of ten designers, including Katie Stout, David Wiseman, and Wendell Castle, tapped by New York gallery R & Co. and Italian carpet purveyor Amini to try their hand at a new medium (for most of them): rugs. The limited-edition pieces— created in India, Nepal, and New York—will be shipped off to Venice upon completion to be displayed as art pieces–cum–floor coverings at Palazzo Benzon in May during the Biennale and then at Design Miami/Basel in June. “We…

help