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category_outlined / Travel & Outdoor
Arizona Highways MagazineArizona Highways Magazine

Arizona Highways Magazine August 2019

For more than 90 years, Arizona Highways has delighted readers with award winning journalism and photography, reflecting Arizona’s stature as one of the top vacation destinations around the globe. Every issue showcases the most amazing photography and valuable information you need to enjoy the unique and diverse travel destinations in and around the state.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Arizona Department of Transportation
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IN THIS ISSUE

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get more online

www.arizonahighways.com /azhighways @arizonahighways An adult verdin, a small songbird found in Arizona’s southern half, clings to a Sonoran Desert saguaro. Lisa Langell CANON EOS 7D, 1/500 SEC, F/7.1, ISO 400, 500 MM LENS FRONT COVER: Late-afternoon monsoon clouds move over Meadow Valley, a Southern Arizona grassland, as seen from a segment of the Arizona Trail. Joel Hazelton CANON EOS 6D, 1/25 SEC, F/14, ISO 100, 100 MM LENS BACK COVER: A Sonoran pronghorn doe guards its fawn near the town of Ajo. Bruce D. Taubert CANON EOS 5D MARK IV, 1/500 SEC, F/7.1, ISO 800, 840 MM LENS…

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editor’s letter

I usually don’t talk to my Uber drivers. Not because I’m aloof. Or because I don’t think they’re interesting — I suppose some are like bartenders, with so many stories of scandal and deceit. But when I get in the back seat, I just want to put on my headphones, turn up the music and check out for a few minutes. I call it “Bobby Time,” and it’s hard to come by. Like first editions of Kerouac. Or californium. So, I don’t know how I got into a conversation with Gene. “You flying out for business or pleasure?” he asked. “A river trip,” I said, thinking my cutoffs and Grateful Dead T-shirt might have signaled as much. “Where you headed?” “Wisconsin.” “Wisconsin! What’s in Wisconsin?” “I’m going kayaking. A place called the Kickapoo River.” The small talk…

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arizona highways

AUGUST 2019 VOL. 95 NO. 8 PUBLISHER Kelly Mero EDITOR Robert Stieve SENIOR EDITOR/BOOKS EDITOR Kelly Vaughn MANAGING EDITOR Noah Austin ASSOCIATE EDITOR/VIDEO EDITOR Ameema Ahmed PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Jeff Kida CREATIVE DIRECTOR Barbara Glynn Denney ART DIRECTOR Keith Whitney MAP DESIGNER Kevin Kibsey PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Michael Bianchi DIRECTOR OF SALES AND MARKETING Karen Farugia WEBMASTER Victoria Snow CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Nicole Bowman DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Matthew Bailey OPERATIONS/IT MANAGER Cindy Bormanis GOVERNOR Douglas A. Ducey DIRECTOR, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION John S. Halikowski…

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contributors

JOEL HAZELTON Joel Hazelton was feeling restless last summer, so he asked our photo editor, Jeff Kida, if Arizona Highways needed anything photographed. The answer was more than Hazelton had expected: We needed someone to shoot the Southern Arizona grasslands (see The Grass Is Always Greener, page 18). “Although I’ve hiked the ‘sky islands’ of Southern Arizona several times, I’ve always skipped over the grasslands and gone straight for the high country,” Hazelton says, “so this assignment was something new and challenging.” He made several trips down south, usually stopping first at the eastern foothills of the Santa Rita Mountains. By the time he was done shooting, he’d endured washed-out roads, monsoon storms and, at times, an overwhelming number of photographic options — especially at Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge. “The…

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letters

editor@arizonahighways.com I read with great interest your cover story on Ted DeGrazia [June 2019]. When I was just out of college, I had a job working for Diamond’s department stores. They did a promotion with Ted DeGrazia, and it was my job to drive him around from store to store and to entertain him. I think he much more entertained me, and we made some interesting stops along the way. At the end of our time together, he grabbed a print of the Superstition Mountains and signed it for me. I’ve had it rolled up in a tube for more than 40 years and just recently had it framed. Thank you for remembering him this month. Mark McFadden, Phoenix I was there when Ted DeGrazia turned in his “dilapidated pickup” and paid cash…

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long-eared myotis

The Disney movie Finding Dory describes the technique of echolocation as “the world’s most powerful pair of glasses.” The long-eared myotis (Myotis evotis) would probably agree. Echolocation is this bat’s method for capturing prey — it sends out high-pitched screams to locate insects, then swoops in for the kill. The foraging process generally starts about an hour after dark. These bats can capture prey both in the air and on the ground, and that versatility requires flying in a methodical pattern that uses more energy. Expending more energy, in turn, means foraging for longer periods of time. In Arizona, the bats are found primarily in the northern and central parts of the state, where they prefer to build their roosts in the stumps of ponderosa pines. ADDITIONAL READING: To learn more about…

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