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category_outlined / Travel & Outdoor
Arizona Highways MagazineArizona Highways Magazine

Arizona Highways Magazine July 2018

For more than 90 years, Arizona Highways has delighted readers with award winning journalism and photography, reflecting Arizona’s stature as one of the top vacation destinations around the globe. Every issue showcases the most amazing photography and valuable information you need to enjoy the unique and diverse travel destinations in and around the state.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Arizona Department of Transportation
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$12
12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time4 min.
editor’s letter

(PHOTOGRAPH BY PAUL MARKOW)I GOT A LETTER the other day from a gentleman named Harley. Harley G. Hecksel. He’s 89. And he lives in Tucson.“I’m an avid collector of Arizona Highways,” he wrote, “and other publications produced by your magazine — some going back to 1945.” His penmanship is flawless. Like a cursive chart above a blackboard in a 1950s classroom.“The latest item in my collection,” he continued, “is a hardcover, 74-page, brilliantly photographed selection of scenes throughout the state. The publication was copyrighted in 1971, and it’s called The Glorious Seasons of Arizona.”Mr. Hecksel wanted to know if we’d ever done a follow-up. It was a simple question, one without an easy answer. Although you’d think we’d have a copy of every book we’ve ever published, protected in an…

access_time2 min.
contributors

(PHOTOGRAPHS: TANGLED LILAC)JACKI LENNERSWriter Jacki Lenners lives in Flagstaff, and at her day job, she touts the benefits of using the city’s public transportation system. Her other passion is checking out the newest additions to the Flagstaff food scene, which she did for this month’s story on Shift (see The Journal: Dining, page 9). “Shift took over a small, popular space in downtown Flagstaff, so we could all see the transformation as it happened,” she says. “I have no idea how they turned a coffee shop into this restaurant, but it totally works. I ate there in the first month and was blown away by how different it was. It’s unlike anything else in Flagstaff.” Because the menu is constantly changing, Lenners says, it’s hard to pick a favorite menu…

access_time3 min.
letters

May 2018editor@arizonahighways.comYOUR ARTICLES AND PHOTOGRAPHS of the Grand Canyon and Colorado River in this latest issue [May 2018] of Arizona Highways showed wonderfully how magnificent this project of nature is. Visiting the Grand Canyon should be on everyone’s bucket list.Bob Klages, Oxford, MichiganYour vivid article [White Water Adventure, May 2018] about rafting through the Grand Canyon didn’t leave much to the imagination. It’s not a trip for the faint of heart. I got a little taste of it when, in 1999, my grandson, Ben, and I joined an Elderhostel rafting trip from Diamond Creek to Lake Mead. He and new friend, Joe, knelt in the very front of the raft and took every action of the rapids full in the face … to their absolute delight. The night on the…

access_time1 min.
the journal

Current EventDry Beaver Creek, south of Sedona and northeast of Camp Verde, belies its name as water flows over smoothed rocks. The creek is a tributary of Wet Beaver Creek, which itself is a tributary of the Verde River. For more information, call the Coconino National Forest’s Red Rock Ranger District at 928-203-2900 or visit www.fs.usda.gov/coconino.(PHOTOGRAPH BY PEGGY COLEMAN)Green HeronsNOAH AUSTINDepending on the season, green herons (Butorides virescens) can be found near water sources just about anywhere in Arizona, but they still can be hard to spot. Unlike larger herons, which often stand in open areas of wetlands, green herons, which are known for their green backs and chestnut bodies, tend to conceal themselves in vegetation. From there, they crouch patiently, then strike with their dagger-like bills to surprise fish.…

access_time3 min.
casa grande valley farms

Casa Grande Valley Farms, shown here around 1940, was an ambitious experiment in large-scale cooperative farming.Depending on whom you talked to, Casa Grande Valley Farms was either visionary or disgraceful. The U.S. government started this 4,300-acre cooperative farm in the late 1930s, during the Great Depression, to help 60 poverty-stricken families get back on their feet. Located in the dusty desert 65 miles southeast of Phoenix, Casa Grande Valley Farms was the region’s only large-scale cooperative farm, and it was home to Arizona farmers and Dust Bowl migrants.The agricultural experiment was born after government planners crunched numbers and found that cooperative farming would yield higher profits than resettling families on individual plots, thanks to economies of scale. With that in mind, the Farm Security Administration, a controversial New Deal agency,…

access_time2 min.
shift

A SHIFT IS A DEVIATION from the expected, a journey into something new and different. After years of building culinary expertise in other people’s restaurants, Joe and Dara Rodger knew their first joint venture would be the ultimate shift.Occupying a bright, narrow storefront in downtown Flagstaff, the Rodgers’ Shift restaurant is about changing perspectives on fine dining and proving a mountain town is ready for elevated cuisine. Don’t expect white tablecloths or a traditional dinner plate of an entrée and side dishes. Instead, let Shift’s expertly trained staff take the wheel, serving as guides to the ever-changing menu of artfully prepared small plates.Joe handles the savory side, while Dara’s love for the art of pastries is front and center on the dessert menu. Those lucky enough to snag a seat…

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