EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Art & Architecture
Architecture AustraliaArchitecture Australia

Architecture Australia May - June 2015

Ask architects which Australian magazine they choose to read or to publish their work and the answer is most likely Architecture Australia. If you want to be up to date with the best built works and the issues that matter, then Architecture Australia is for you. Its commissioned contributors are independent, highly respected practitioners, architectural thinkers and design commentators and each article is supported by images from leading architectural photographers. Provocative, informative and engaging – it is the national magazine of the Australian Institute of Architects.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Architecture Media Pty Ltd
Read Morekeyboard_arrow_down
BUY ISSUE
$12.95(Incl. tax)
SUBSCRIBE
$52(Incl. tax)
6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time6 min.
david welsh, christine major welsh and major architects

There is a running joke among architects in small practices about when they are perceived to be “emerging.” This adjective is applied liberally to describe young keen graduates, but also architects whose work shifts from one scale to another. Architects who have produced a range of small, significant projects over the course of ten years are suddenly “rediscovered” by the media as they climb to the next, larger scale of work.David Welsh and Christine Major enjoy this debate as they find themselves, a decade after forming their practice Welsh and Major Architects, still being called “emerging.” We joke that they may have died of old age by the time they have “emerged,” with perhaps a sixty-year body of work behind them.Welsh and Major’s early work attracted attention: Fitzroy Terrace in…

access_time1 min.
bendigo hospital

DESIGN ARCHITECTBates Smart 02 The ground-level floor plan shows an internal street separating the regional integrated cancer centre from medical imaging and the emergency department.03 The lobby’s ceiling will be made of woven timber, its small apertures allowing natural light to create a dappled pattern on the light-coloured plaster walls and concrete paving.HEALTH PLANNING ARCHITECTSilver Thomas HanleyLOCATIONBendigo, VictoriaCLIENTLend LeasePROCUREMENT METHODNovated contractSIZE (FLOOR AREA)99,000 mNO. ROOMS/BEDS2515 roomsCOST$630 millionTIMEFRAMEDue for completion December 2016…

access_time2 min.
new commissions, project plans revealed and an interview

John Wardle Architects’ I Dips Me Lid, the inaugural commission for the NGV’s Ephemeral Architecture program. Image: John Wardle ArchitectsNGV launches summer pavilion seriesThe National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) has launched the Commission for Ephemeral Architecture, an annual architecture commission for a temporary outdoor installation over spring and summer. The initiative gives architects an opportunity to design an innovative outdoor structure in the NGV International’s garden. Melbourne practice John Wardle Architects has designed the inaugural commission, due to open in September 2015.FOR INFORMATION ABOUT THE COMMISSION AND CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS, VISIT architectureau.com/articles/ngv-launches-summer-pavilion-architectural-commissionSplash outdoor amphitheatre by ARM Architecture and Topotek1. Image: ARMARM to make a “Splash” on the Gold CoastIn November 2013, ARM Architecture and Berlin-based landscape architecture practice Topotek1 won a commission to design an amphitheatre for the Gold Coast…

access_time1 min.
sunshine coast public university hospital

01 A circular, timber-clad hub orients users and houses the Skills, Academic and Research Centre (SARC).02 Spaces are planned so that staff and escorted patients (red) and logistics (yellow) are isolated from the general public (blue).03 The Inpatient Unit’s narrow corridors maximize views of the outdoors.04 The hospital’s Outdoor Room defines the entry and the interface between the acute hospital and the hub, and takes advantage of the Sunshine Coast’s subtropical climate with a generous garden court and informal seating.05 Timber screening runs throughout the hospital’s “Main Street.”ARCHITECTSunshine Coast Architects – joint venture between Architectus and HDR Rice DaubneyLOCATIONKawana, QueenslandCLIENTQueensland HealthPROCUREMENT METHODPublic–private partnershipSIZE (FLOOR AREA)160,000 mNO. ROOMS/BEDS738 bedsCOST$1.8 billionTIMEFRAMEDue for completion 2016…

access_time6 min.
interview: corbett lyon, julie willis and stefano scalzo

Children explore the planted terraces of the Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital in Brisbane. (Photography: Kylie Gow)Cameron Bruhn: Tell me about your research project and what you hope to achieve. Corbett Lyon: There has been extensive evidence-based research undertaken over the last ten years to identify environmental factors that have been shown to reduce stress for patients and families and that contribute to a patient’s wellbeing and recovery. As designers, we’re interested in understanding how these attributes can be incorporated in a meaningful way into a hospital’s design. We see this project very much as applied research: how these existing, evidence-based findings can be translated into a form that is useful for our design discipline.Julie Willis: Within that evidence-based research, we can point to a whole series of design factors…

access_time6 min.
settling in

Mornington Centre (stage 2) by Billard Leece Partnership in Mornington, Victoria, a subacute project providing rehabilitation services. (Photography: Shannon McGrath)For more than fifty years, researchers have investigated the impact of the built environment on the health outcomes of hospital patients and the general wellbeing of the staff who care for them. Despite this significant history, our knowledge base can often be incomplete or contradictory, arguably due to a lack of long-term post-occupancy research. But why is this the case?In any discussion on evidence-based design, there are two polar concerns to bear in mind. First, as a profession, we rarely seek the kind of detailed knowledge that can only be generated by a rigorous post-occupancy evaluation (POE) process, perhaps because of the limited performative demands or because our training in…

help