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Artist ProfileArtist Profile

Artist Profile Issue 41

Artist Profile is a leading quarterly journal taking its readers into the studios and minds of contemporary artists across Australasia and beyond. Industry professionals engage leading practitioners and emerging talent in conversations about their art, in their own words, while our exclusive photo shoots provide intimate access into artists’ personal and working lives. Readers gain knowledge of artists’ methods, preview works in progress and discover the life experiences that ignite artistic imaginations.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Artist Profile Pty Ltd
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4 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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contributors

THE AP TEAMEDITORKon Gouriotisartistprofile@nextmedia.com.auART DIRECTORKim Gregorykgregory@nextmedia.com.auDEPUTY EDITORLucy Strangerlstranger@nextmedia.com.auSUB-EDITORJamie McIlwraithCONTRIBUTORSDR ASHLEY CRAWFORDis a Melbourne-based arts journalist; cargocollective.com/ashleycrawfordBRIDGET MACLEODis an arts writer and curator. She is the Gallery Officer at Shoalhaven City Art Centre, NowraJUDITH PUGHis a regional NSW based writer. She is doing a doctorate on Commonwealth visual arts fundingLOUISE MARTIN-CHEWis a PhD candidate at the University of Queensland; louisemartinchew.comELLI WALSHis a Sydney-based arts writerLOUELLA HAYESis a Perth-based arts writer and gallery administratorOWEN CRAVENis a Melbourne-based writer; he is a curator with Urban Art ProjectsMICHAEL YOUNGis a visual arts writer based in AustraliaSOPHIA CAIis a Melbourne-based curator and arts writer KIM GUTHRIEis a photographer, kimguthrieaustralia.comTED SNELLis Director of the Cultural Precinct at the University of Western AustraliaANDREW TURLEYis a Sydney based author of A day-by-day guide to the Adelaide Ladies: 59…

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editor's note

“I BELIEVE AN ARTIST HAS TO GET a life rather than a career. They have to experience the wide variety of things that life can give you, all the changes that can happen.” William Robinson’s cover story interview with Louise Martin-Chew for this issue of Artist Profile is a fascinating read, full of apt observations and good advice, especially for anyone whose life is involved in the visual arts.There are particular artists whose achievements are important to an understanding of visual art. Robinson is undoubtedly one of those artists, and not to recognise him is to be unaware: there are few who can surpass his sensitivity. And at 81, he still has something to achieve.After being absorbed in media accounts of the 2006 “July War” between Israel and Lebanon, in…

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melbourne art fair v sydney art fair

EARLIER THIS YEAR, AS THE 2017 EDITION OF SYDNEY Contemporary (SC) art fair hit its straps, one visitor among the many attending the four-day event could be seen attentively navigating her way between the spacious booths. That was Maree Di Pasquale, the recently appointed CEO of the Melbourne Art Fair (MAF) who has been charged with resurrecting the biennial MAF, the last edition of which was cancelled in 2016 at short notice among accusations that it had become moribund and irrelevant.Many thought MAF’s condition terminal, but it will return to the art fair calendar on 2-5 August 2018 at Southbank Arts Precinct, just a few weeks before SC transitions from a biannual to an annual art fair. Both fairs will be vying to attract the same collectors, buyers and international…

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sanne koelemij

Canberra-based artist Sanne Koelemij creates collaged compositions that recalibrate the dialogue between colour, shape and material. Her shapes warp in kaleidoscopic patterns while depth and surface merge in tactile constellations camouflaged by plays of light and colour, creating a visual tension that is both disarming and alluring.01 Untitled (Frankenstein), 2015, acrylic and spray paint on cardboard, plastic, hessian, raw canvas, tracing paper, polyester and wood, 200 x 205cm02 Paper Plains III, 2016, acrylic on Perspex, 41 x 51cm“I became drawn to materials with interesting ‘deformities’ such as a shoe print pressed onto surfaces; like a fingerprint. This became addictive and I started collecting any type of texture I could find – I was ‘dumpster diving’ at this time!IN WHAT WAYS HAVE YOU BEEN EXPANDING YOUR practice since graduating from the…

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margaret loypula

02 Anatye (Bush Potato), 2012, acrylic on linen,151 x 152cmMargaret Loy Pula paints experiences. Her sometimes austere and at other times vibrantly colourful paintings record the rhythms of her Anmatyerre culture through fine dots. The dots begin in the centre of her paintings, and move in a weblike spread, creating their own geometric shapes, spaces and sizes as bear witness to Pula’s stories. Earlier this year she was awarded the Arthur Guy Memorial Prize and in September she was the winner of the Tattersall’s Art Prize in Brisbane. Last month in her first exhibition at Marc Straus Gallery, New York, she was shown with the Viennese artist Hermann Nitsch. And this is where ARTIST PROFILE begins the conversation.03 Margaret Loy Pula at Katz’s Delicatessen, New York, 2017WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST…

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william robinson

William Robinson has reached the greatest heights available to an Australian artist and is the only living Australian artist with a gallery dedicated to his work, the William Robinson Gallery at Old Government House in Brisbane. Reaching international acclaim, William Robinson: Genesis has just opened in Washington DC, and will travel to Paris in January 2018. He works across subjects from epic landscape paintings to characterful portraits and, increasingly in recent years where age restricts his ability to be in the landscape, still-life. In his 81st year, he remains committed to taking his paintings into new territory.02 Creation landscape: The dome of space and time, 2003-04, oil on linen, triptych, 152 x 641cm“Not knowing how the picture is going to be resolved is a very important thing. I think you…

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