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Australian HunterAustralian Hunter

Australian Hunter Edition 61

Australian Hunter aims to create a better environment and community understanding of all forms of hunting, whether for animal management, trophies or food for the family table. The magazine features articles and advice on hunting all manner of game from rabbits, foxes and goats to pigs, deer, buffaloes and more. Also featured are product reviews by experienced hunters and outdoor enthusiasts on firearms, optics, knives and related gear for the field, as well as practical advice for tracking, hunting, butchering and cooking game.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sporting Shooters' Association of Australia
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4 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
from the editor

Welcome to Australian Hunter 61. First up, Ted Mitchell travels to the Northern Territory in search of big, mud-encrusted buffaloes for their meat. Ted and his hunting party also manage to rid the property of a few feral pigs and donkeys as well.Peter d’Plesse goes back to basics with an overview on the biology and behaviour of feral pigs, while John Pond discusses the benefits of using boats to reach out-of-the-way hunting places and the regulations to be aware of. Still on safety, Christie Pisani, from the Heart of the Huntress series, offers five tips for staying safe when out hunting.In an emotive international analysis, Johan van Wyk reflects on Africa’s controversial history of rhinoceros poaching and the aftermath it has left for wildlife managers and recreational hunters alike.Back to…

access_time9 min.
buffaloes - exciting but dangerous

The massive mud-encrusted buffalo bull suddenly turned and took off through the mimosa bush for parts unknown. Putting the Swarovski scope onto him, his rear end was all that could be seen departing. Taking careful aim and squeezing the trigger, there was a resounding boom as my .300 Weatherby spat out a Barnes TTSX projectile. Perhaps I had better start at the beginning to put this story into perspective.The trip to the Northern Territory from near Brisbane in Queensland took us three full days. Boy, it is a long drive. The weather seemed to be against us as it was raining when we left home and also coming down unseasonably hard around the far west. As we came close to Blackall, the flooded roads had been closed but luckily just…

access_time10 min.
the ruger american rimfire

With retail pricing from around $630, the Ruger American Rimfire represents great value for money.I have a pretty standard approach to testing rifles and I started my review of the Ruger American Rimfire .22LR 18" OD Green rifle the way I usually do. The only variation was that instead of doing the sighting-in at my local SSAA range, I was using the private 50m range on my hunting buddy’s farm.It did not take many shots to have the Ruger shooting to point of aim at 50m, good enough to test some groupings of different ammo types. However, before I could settle down and start shooting groups, a shower of rain came over and reduced my batch of targets to soggy paper mâché.The range has a few metal plates hanging from…

access_time10 min.
understanding the feral pig

I have been hunting pigs in a range of habitats for more than 40 years and they still continue to surprise me.Hearing and smell are powerful senses for the feral pig.The feral pig (Sus scrofa) is an underrated game animal. While not as glamorous as a stag carrying a good spread of antlers, or exotic international game such as tahrs, pigs deserve respect as hunting animals. They are great survivors, adapting well to a range of environments.Hunting big pigs on foot is a challenge with direct environmental and economic benefits. Successful hunting demands knowledge and understanding of animal behaviour. I have been hunting pigs in a range of habitats for more than 40 years and they still continue to surprise me.DescriptionDomestic and feral pigs have clear physical differences. The feral…

access_time11 min.
browning’s x-bolt composite stalker

It’s hard to believe that the Browning X-Bolt has been in production since 2009. Being manufactured alongside its stablemates in the Browning A-Bolt II and AB3, it is a symbiosis between the parent company in Browning and BC Miroku, of Japan. The Japanese firearm giant has been turning out all manner of longarms for Browning and Winchester for decades, such is the quality of its products and their acceptance worldwide. The A-Bolt and X-Bolt range of rifles have been well accepted into the Australian marketplace, being synonymous with accuracy, reliability and value for money.The X-Bolt collection has gone from strength to strength, with Browning constantly refining the design, bringing in fresh variants while discontinuing older models. This decision-making process by Browning keeps the X-Bolt category a top seller worldwide. Many…

access_time3 min.
safety in the field - prevention over cure

I recently came across a website dedicated to publicising the dangers of hunting and why it should be banned. With stories sporting the headlines “Man killed when mistaken for a turkey” and “Rattlesnake drops teenage hunter”, it became apparent that this was an American site. We Australians have had our fair share of mishaps in the outdoors, although they are fortunately less publicised and rarely to do with turkeys, at least of the feathered kind!I’m sure that hunters are under no misconceptions of the unique safety considerations that must taken with what we choose do for recreation. If that bothered us, we would probably be attending pottery classes on the weekends, instead of going head to head with cranky feral beasts in the land where snakes roam young and free.…

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