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category_outlined / Boating & Aviation
Cruising WorldCruising World

Cruising World March 2019

Cruising World is your passport for exploring the world’s coastlines and oceans while voyaging under sail. Its contributors inspire and entertain through stories, pictures and videos that underscore the beauty and adventure of sailing, while providing instruction on the disciplines of seamanship, navigation and boat handling. The Cruising World community is made up of experienced, committed sailors and boat owners. No matter their long-range sailing plans, Cruising World’s mission is to nurture their dreams with practical how-to information and stirring real-life adventure features.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bonnier Corporation
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8 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time4 min.
sail a little and raise a lot

Here at CW, we hear all sorts of reasons why people go sailing, but I think I like Tracy Howard’s the best. Last year, racing in Columbia Yacht Club’s Chicago Leukemia Cup Regatta, she raised $130,034 — top in the nation — to help fight blood cancers. Donald and Margret Steiner and team My Girl put a day on the water to good use too. Their crew collected and donated $130,010 during the New York Yacht Club’s Leukemia Cup in Newport, Rhode Island, earning them the Robert Edward Maher Memorial Trophy, a new award to honor a lifetime member of the Southern Yacht Club who died last fall after a long fight with multiple myeloma. New Orleans’ SYC hosted last fall’s Leukemia Cup Regatta Fantasy Sail, an annual affair where 100 or…

access_time3 min.
underway

PACIFIC DREAMS The Tuamotu Archipelago was one of the destinations my partner, Micha, and I had been looking forward to the most on our circumnavigation route aboard Pantagruel, our classic 60-foot yawl. Sailing in this remote part of the world, alone among a few scattered atolls, with the great blue expanse of the South Pacific Ocean all around us, was what I’d visualized when I thought of the trip. There are around 80 islands and atolls making up the Tuamotus, which originally formed from volcanoes that rose up high above sea level. Coral then grew around the perimeter and was left behind when the land eventually sank back into the sea, leaving a circular coral rim dotted with palm-tree-sprinkled motus (a Polynesian word meaning small island or coral islets), surrounding a lovely…

access_time1 min.
time for vessel documentation renewal?

Many United States-based sailors headed offshore choose to document their vessel with the U.S. Coast Guard. The Certificate of Documentation tends to be more readily accepted than just a state registration when clearing into another country. In addition, some banks and insurance companies even require it. In the middle of the government shutdown, the Coast Guard has done something nice. On January 4, 2019, it sent out a bulletin announcing a new multiyear Certificate of Documentation for recreational boaters. This eminently sensible approach to paperwork means you can now apply for up to a five-year expiration date when you renew, paying $26 for each year, up to $130. Five years may be a bit of a gamble depending on how long you tend to keep boats, but this definitely seems a…

access_time2 min.
stay on board

Lifelines are set at precisely the correct height to tip the average-sized person over the side. I am 6-foot-3-inches and so have no chance. Jacklines on the deck, clipped to the harness you are, of course, wearing, do a perfect job of ensuring that you remain attached to the boat while being dragged alongside. This is infinitely preferable to bobbing in the wake, but getting back on board is very difficult, if not impossible. In my opinion, staying on the boat was the better option, so I rigged chest-high lines from stern, to center shrouds, to pulpit, on both sides of the boat. These stopped us from falling over the side, provided a real sense of security, were simpler to rig and use than jacklines, and made a great place…

access_time2 min.
a cool, quiet bareboat ride

In a bid to add renewable-power generation as an option for vacation sailors, Voyage Charters offers a 48-foot multihull powered by electric drives; a 57-foot model is also on the drawing board. That makes Voyage among the first, if not the first, to offer electric marine propulsion for charter. One other builder, Maine Cat, of Bremen, Maine, launched its first electric MC 38 LS-E sailing catamaran in September 2018, but as of yet, has no plans to add the model to its charter operation in Hope Town, Abaco, in the Bahamas. The Voyage 480, of which one is now available for charter in Tortola, in the British Virgin Islands, will also serve as a demo for future electric Voyage Yacht sales, to the private market and to charter yacht owners. Like the 480,…

access_time1 min.
yachtie appreciation week

Attention Caribbean sailors! If you’re looking for some fun festivities with fellow cruisers, then head to Portsmouth, Dominica, the week of March 10, 2019, for the 4th Annual Yachtie Appreciation Week! The big news this year is the completion of the mooring field, which has 30 moorings for visitors. During Yachtie Appreciation Week, the moorings will be free on a first-come, first-served basis. Also, during the week, cruisers can take advantage of discounted island tours and a free party at Cabrits National Park on Saturday, March 16th. The annual event is organized by the Portsmouth Association of Yacht Services.…

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