EXPLOREMY LIBRARYMAGAZINES
CATEGORIES
  • Art & Architecture
  • Boating & Aviation
  • Business & Finance
  • Cars & Motorcycles
  • Celebrity & Gossip
  • Comics & Manga
  • Crafts
  • Culture & Literature
  • Family & Parenting
  • Fashion
  • Food & Wine
  • Health & Fitness
  • Home & Garden
  • Hunting & Fishing
  • Kids & Teens
  • Luxury
  • Men's Lifestyle
  • Movies, TV & Music
  • News & Politics
  • Photography
  • Science
  • Sports
  • Tech & Gaming
  • Travel & Outdoor
  • Women's Lifestyle
  • Adult
FEATURED
EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Cars & Motorcycles
Evo

Evo

February 2020

Produced by world-class motoring journalists and racers, evo communicates the raw emotion of owning, driving and testing the world’s greatest performance cars. Bringing together informative car reviews, vivid photography, exciting track tests and dramatic drive stories in glorious landscapes, evo is considered the bible for performance car enthusiasts.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Dennis Publishing UK
Read More
SPECIAL: Save 30% on your subscription!
BUY ISSUE
$8.98(Incl. tax)
SUBSCRIBE
$71.95$50.37(Incl. tax)
12 Issues

In this issue

2 min.
ed speak

I’LL BE HONEST, IT WAS ALL LOOKING A BIT doom and gloom throughout 2019. evo’s inbox swelled with announcements of an industry plugging into an electric SUV future. For those who enjoy driving and question the green credentials of these two-ton-plus monstrosities that barely fit on our roads, the outlook was a little bleak. The car as we know it was on its last legs, spluttering on its final drop of unleaded, consigned to history to make way for motorised batteries to share the roads with archaic diesel taxis. Granted, the poorly thought-out Ultra Low Emission Zones coming into force in the UK and across Europe will continue to present unnecessary challenges to those who enjoy escaping the city in a ’90s or noughties icon, but there are green shoots sprouting…

1 min.
evo

EDITORIAL 020 3890 3890 eds@evo.co.uk www.evo.co.uk evo, Dennis Publishing, 31-32 Alfred Place, London WC1E 7DP, United Kingdom EDITOR Stuart Gallagher MANAGING EDITOR Ian Eveleigh DEPUTY EDITOR Adam Towler ART EDITOR Rich Browne SUBEDITOR Jonathan Baker STAFF WRITERS Antony Ingram Jordan Katsianis STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Aston Parrott EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Sam Jenkins CONTRIBUTING EDITORS John Barker Henry Catchpole Richard Meaden Richard Porter Steve Sutcliffe GROUP WEB EDITOR Steve Walker EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Steve Fowler CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jethro Bovingdon Mark McArthur-Christie CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Will Aron Trevor Foster Barry Hayden James Lipman Charlie McGee James Wadham IT WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN POSSIBLE WITHOUT Peter Allen Bedford Autodrome Rob Gould Nicky Grist Bob Harper Nick Stafford CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER Julian Lloyd-Evans GROUP ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Steve Machin ADVERTISING MANAGER Pierre Clements ACCOUNT MANAGER Miles Taylor DIRECT MARKETING MANAGER Hannah Manning-Swallow PRODUCTION MANAGER Mike Hills COMMERCIAL PUBLISHER Sarah Perks CLIENT SALES MANAGER Neale Salt ACCOUNT MANAGER Dan Wallace SENIOR SALES EXECUTIVE Demi Davies NEWSTRADE DIRECTOR David Barker CREATIVE SOLUTIONS HEAD OF COMMERCIAL DESIGN Rob Callaghan GROUP PROJECT MANAGER Avril Donnelly SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER Ludovica D’Angelo LICENSING & SYNDICATION INTERNATIONAL DIRECTOR Ian Bedwell LICENSING MANAGER Carlotta Serantoni LICENSING & SYNDICATION EXECUTIVE Nicole Adams PUBLISHING PUBLISHING MANAGER Amrit Gill DENNIS PUBLISHING CHIEF BRAND OFFICER Nicola Bates MANAGING DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL Nick Flood CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Pete Wootton GROUP CEO James Tye COMPANY FOUNDER Felix Dennis…

10 min.
mclarensenna gtr

TRACK-ONLY SUPERCARS NEED rebranding. They’re amongst the wildest, most outrageous and most technologically advanced cars ever built. They pay no heed to humdrum considerations such as pedestrian safety laws, nor do they adhere to restrictive motorsport regulations. They use the most exotic materials, the most innovative moveable aerodynamic devices and their power outputs and performance potential dwarfs that of most high-end factory GT race cars. This is Can-Am played out by the likes of Ferrari, McLaren and Aston Martin. These are the Group B hypercars. The difference is they’re available not just to the world’s elite drivers. Real-life customers can buy and experience these no-rules monsters. McLaren’s latest take on this rarefied breed is the Senna GTR. And it has 172bhp, erm, less than its predecessor, the brilliantly bonkers P1 GTR.…

8 min.
aston martin dbx

IN EVO’S WORLD THE PERFORMANCE SUV is an oxymoron. A car that weighs the wrong side of two thousand kilos, has a footprint on a par with a limo’s and a centre of gravity that’s closer to a Transit’s than an Elise’s is not a sports car in our eyes. No matter their supercar power outputs and Nürburgring lap times, SUVs masquerading as sports cars and which claim to be driver’s cars have never sat comfortably with us. Nor with you, which is why we’ve wound back the column inches given to such vehicles. This may have you questioning why you are looking at an image of and have started reading the 1600 accompanying words describing a 2245kg, near five-metre-long vehicle that looks like and claims to be a performance SUV.…

8 min.
bmw m340i xdrive

TIME WAS WHEN THE APPEARANCE OF a new, top-of-the-range BMW 3-series was A Really Big Deal. Something to look forward to. Whether 2.5-litre E30, 2.5- or 2.8-litre E36, 2.8- or 3-litre E46 or even, to a lesser extent, an E90 with that lovely, raspy, magnesium N52 six, a big-engined 3er was all crisp, confident and unmistakable lines, symphonic engine and entertaining rear-drive dynamics. If the M3 was a stretch too far for the wallet, then opting for the top of the regular range was hardly something to weep into the sauerkraut over, and it was never, ever, a car to be confused with a sturdy but much less flamboyant rival from the other side of the tracks in Stuttgart, or Ingolstadt. But in more recent years that intangible specialness has morphed…

6 min.
how low can you go?

BETWEEN MAY AND AUGUST LAST YEAR, London’s new Ultra Low Emission Zone, or ULEZ, saw 224,000 brown-enveloped fines hitting drivers’ doormats and netting Transport for London (TfL) nearly £11million in fine income. TfL’s seen just under £31million roll in in £12.50-per-vehicle ULEZ tax payments too, a fair start to trousering a potential combined tax and fine income of £120million a year. Although according to DEFRA (the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs) the air in London is the cleanest it’s been since records began, the ULEZ is designed to clean it up still further by targeting nitrogen oxides, or NOx, from road transport with a £12.50 daily tax that’s applicable to many older cars. But surely this is a good thing if Londoners get cleaner air. How can the owners of…