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Golf MagazineGolf Magazine

Golf Magazine

September 2019

Golf Magazine is the number one source for golf instruction, equipment and travel, including: exclusive instruction from our Top 100 Teachers in America, introspective interviews with the game’s rising stars and old masters, and short-game tips from guru David Pelz. Plus, you’ll get the latest in gear, including ClubTest equipment reviews, and private lessons, tips personalized for your game.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
EB Golf Media
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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golf magazine

PUBLISHER HOWARD MILSTEIN EDITOR-IN-CHIEF DAVID DENUNZIO EDITORIAL Editorial Director ASHLEY MAYO Executive Editor JOHN MCALLEY Managing Editor JOHN LEDESMA Senior Writers MICHAEL BAMBERGER, ALAN SHIPNUCK Managing Editors MICHAEL CHWASKY (EQUIPMENT), GARY PERKINSON (PRODUCTION), LUKE KERR-DINEEN (INSTRUCTION), JONATHAN WALL (EQUIPMENT) Contributing Editor EVAN ROTHMAN Contributing Writers MICHAEL CORCORAN, WILL LEITCH, JOSH SENS, PAUL SULLIVAN Analytics Editor MARK BROADIE Contributing Instructors THE TOP 100 TEACHERS IN AMERICA ART + PHOTO Design WORKS WELL WITH OTHERS DESIGN GROUP DAVID CURCURITO, JESSICA MUSUMECI, STRAVINSKI PIERRE, VIVIAN SUCHMAN Photo Editor JESSE REITER Consulting Photo Editor NANCY JO IACOI Contributing Photographers JAMIE CHUNG, NIGEL COX, CHRISTIAN HAFER, JOHN HUET, CHELSEA KYLE, MATTHEW SALACUSE, SHAUGHN AND JOHN Contributing Illustrators BEAUDANIELS.COM, NIGEL BUCHANAN, ALAN DANIELS, BARRY FALLS, ROSS MACDONALD, BEN MOUNSEY-WOOD, JASON RAISH Chief Digital Officer ROB DECHIARO Executive Editor (DIGITAL) ALAN BASTABLE Digital Development Editor JEFF RITTER Multimedia Editor JESSICA MARKSBURY Senior Editor JOSHUA BERHOW Senior Producer KEVIN CUNNINGHAM Associate Editors DYLAN…

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welcome to the machine

IN JUNE, THE NATIONAL GOLF FOUNDATION, the Jupiter, Fla.-based nonprofit research group that monitors the game’s growth and vitality, released some promising participation numbers. The one that caught my eye was 2.6 million, which according to the NGF, represents the number of beginners who played on a course for the first time in 2018, a historic high. Good news. Great news, actually. Digging a bit further, I found that 18 percent of these beginners were over the age of 50—not a historic level, but the highest number in a decade. Props to Boomers and Gen Xers notwithstanding, the long-term health of our sport depends on more youth. Unfortunately, junior participation sagged in 2018 compared to the previous two years, and what the NGF considers to be the game-growth gold mine—18-…

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feel the noise

There was a day when golf fans observed a level of decorum that was indicative of the game—gentlemanly (and gentlewomanly) conduct in which good play was recognized and rewarded with applause and orderly enthusiasm. These days, however, the shouting, calling out of names, and the general disorder at pro golf events has diminished the apparent quality of the gallery (or “patrons” if you wish) to nothing more than an unruly gang that might be found at a soccer match or a football game. Enthusiasm is one thing—disorderliness and rudeness are quite another. I have finally reached the point where although I’m an avid fan and continue to watch golf on television, I can no longer tolerate the lack of civility and dignity of too many who attend the tournaments. Now I simply…

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lower digs deep

THE WEB.COM TOUR CHAMPIONSHIP—excuse us, the Korn Ferry Tour Championship—is the most brutally Darwinian tournament in golf. Last year its very essence was boiled down to one 8-foot birdie putt, faced by a mild-mannered, 29-year-old Ohioan named Justin Lower. Make it and he would earn a promotion to the PGA Tour; miss it and Lower was doomed to spend another year haunting the minor leagues, with all the frustrations and indignities and money-related stress that entails. As Lower stalked his putt on the 18th hole at Atlantic Beach (Fla.) Country Club, Jim Knous was watching from a Golf Channel set a hundred yards away. (His Twitter nickname, “Jimmy Hard K,” offers a guide to pronunciation.) Knous had exited the 18th hole projected as 25th on the season-ending money list, which, if…

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on the number

8 With Dustin Johnson’s second-place finishes at the Masters and the PGA Championship, the number of players who’ve bagged the career “Runner-up Slam.” DJ joins Craig Wood, Arnie, Jack, Watson, Norman, Lefty and Louis Oosthuizen. $ 75,000 Dollar amount of winning bid at charity auction to carry Tiger Woods’s bag in this December’s Hero World Challenge. AVERAGE CLUBHEAD SPEED ON TOUR Top 20 over the last 10 years: Men’s national championship trophies (16) won by the University of Houston since the NCAA took over the tournament. (Yale won 20 from 1897-1936.) 29.47 Percentage of first-place prize money won by Rory McIlroy in the PGA Tour events he’s entered through the U.S. Open (first on Tour).…

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the champ: gary woodland

GOLF’S COGNOSCENTI HAVE KNOWN FOR A DECADE that Gary Woodland had all the tools. But tools alone are not enough. That was the lesson of his U.S. Open win at Pebble Beach. In victory, Woodland, 35, spoke of how he has learned to manage his talent, praising particularly his former coach (Butch Harmon) and his current coach (Pete Cowen). “I kept telling myself, ‘Enjoy this moment. Enjoy the pressure. Enjoy being uncomfortable. Don’t shy away from it, embrace it.’ And I think that helped me stay a little more calm.” Three quick things about that statement. First of all, it’s deeply articulate, as is Woodland. Also, it shows a thinking and aware person. But it should be noted that saying it and doing it are two different things. At Pebble, Gary did…

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