ZINIO logo
EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Home & Garden
Good Organic Gardening

Good Organic Gardening Issue#6.2

Gardening with goodness at its heart — fresh, organic and fun. This magazine is 100% real. We are unashamedly earthy, reflecting the spirit and culture of people who just love to get their hands dirty. Our emphasis is on productive gardening. We just love the satisfaction of growing your own and finding new ways to bring produce to the table. The magazine includes features such as Amazing Gardens, Celebrity Chefs, Celebrity Gardeners, Clever Crops, Flavours of the month, Garden solutions, Kids Corner, Living Organics, Weekend Gardening, What’s New and a guide to What’s on Where. Purchase includes the Digital Edition and News Service. Please stay in touch via our Facebook Page.

Read More
Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Universal Wellbeing PTY Limited
Frequency:
Bimonthly
BUY ISSUE
$3.85(Incl. tax)
SUBSCRIBE
$16.17(Incl. tax)
6 Issues

in this issue

7 min.
the water-less gardener

Apassionate innovator, John Kersten likes to use logic to solve problems and creates ever-new models of the things he likes. Originally from New Zealand’s North Island, he grew up on a dairy farm but now lives in the climatically unpredictable and challenged “peanut country” of South East Queensland. Wilkesdale is near the town of Kingaroy, in the South Burnett region, an area that has been intensively farmed for generations, drastically altering this subtropical zone into a drought- and floodprone region. Tank water is precious in times of drought, so when John heard about wicking beds, or water-less gardens, from a friend, he decided to calculate the amount of water he was using on his garden. He was astounded. “I worked out roughly that to get 1kg of produce from my old…

8 min.
the big warm-up

The shortest day has passed, the daytime temperatures may be gradually starting to rise in your area, and the days are lengthening as we head into the last winter month. Soil temperatures will also be, hopefully, starting to rise. But what does this mean for the gardener? Time to get busy, that’s what! Busy getting your soil ready for the new season’s plantings and watching existing plants and gardens start to take off We’ve been talking about everything to do with soils for quite some months now and we have looked at a wide range of topics relating to creating and understanding how to maintain a good, healthy soil and great gardens. But really, what makes good soil? This issue, I thought we’d do an overview of how all these things come together…

3 min.
things to do in july

VEGETABLES COOL & TEMPERATE Despite the cooler conditions, cold winds can dry soil, especially in containers and raised beds. Combat slower growth with regular watering and liquid feeding and you’ll be harvesting winter crops including cabbages, sprouts and leafy greens such as rocket and soft-hearted lettuce. Red-leafed lettuce varieties perform well during winter. Plan for spring by sowing broad beans and spring onions. This is also time to plant perennial vegies such as asparagus and rhubarb, which are planted from crowns. TROPICAL This is a bountiful time of the year in the tropics, but keep all crops watered, especially leafy vegies. If these want for water, they are likely to become bitter as they change from leafy growth to flowering. Regular water and fortnightly liquid fertiliser encourage tender growth. While watering, look for grasshoppers…

7 min.
home on the range

The historic Victorian town of Creswick, 19km north of Ballarat and an hour north-west of Melbourne, nestles among the hills at the southern end of the Great Dividing Range, 430m above sea level. Now home to around 3000 people, it boasted nearly 10 times that number during the mid-19th-century gold-rush days, which is when many of the fine old buildings that grace its wide streets were built. Val’s family has been in Creswick at least since then. A fifth-generation local, Val is deeply involved in the history of the town. She’s secretary of the Creswick Historical Society and was preparing for the centenary ANZAC commemorations when Good Organic Gardening spoke to her. “Bales serve as a frame. As they decompose they get dug into the garden beds and I replace them with…

1 min.
glazed turnips

Serves 4 as a side Ingredients • 1kg small turnips • 1½ cups water • 2 tbsp butter • 1 tbsp lemon juice • 1½ tsp coconut sugar • ½ tsp Celtic sea salt • Fresh thyme sprigs for garnish Method 1. Peel turnips, then cut in half lengthways. 2. Arrange turnips in one layer in a 12in heavy skillet and add enough water to reach halfway up turnips. 3. Add butter, sugar and salt, cover and boil over medium heat, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes. 4. Remove lid and continue cooking until water has evaporated, stirring occasionally until golden brown. 5. Add lemon juice. 6. Transfer to serving dish and d rizzle with the rest of the lemon glaze and a sprig of thyme.…

7 min.
the indoor outdoor garden

The concept of the greenhouse is hardly new. Roman historian Pliny the Elder described a structure that supplied the emperor Tiberius with cucumbers all year round. In medieval Italy, hothouses or giardini botanici were built to nurture exotic plants that explorers brought back from the tropics. As glass-making techniques advanced during the 17th century, so did the construction of greenhouses in England and on the Continent — one of the largest was built at the Palace of Versailles. But it wasn’t until the Victorian era that the greenhouse truly came into its own, exemplified by immense structures like London’s Kew Gardens and The Crystal Palace. In the Netherlands, one of the birthplaces of the modern greenhouse, industrial greenhouse agriculture has developed to the point where an estimated 10,500 hectares (0.25 per cent…