Health September 2021

Enjoy living the healthy life with solutions and advice from the experts at HEALTH magazine! Each issue is packed with smart and fun new ways to stay in terrific shape, look amazing and discover tasty (and healthy!) things to eat. For annual or monthly subscriptions (on all platforms except iOS), your subscription will automatically renew and be charged to your provided payment method at the end of the term unless you choose to cancel. You may cancel at any time during your subscription in your account settings. If your provided payment method cannot be charged, we may terminate your subscription.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Meredith Operations Corporation
Frequency:
Monthly
$7.32(Incl. tax)
$21.96(Incl. tax)
10 Issues

in this issue

2 min
from the editor: own your age

People say that 50 is the new 30, and while I appreciate and agree with the notion—that 50 isn’t “old”—it kind of misses the point. Every age and stage has its benefits, and I try to embrace them rather than look back. Case in point: When I was in my 30s, I was in the glorious, messy whirlwind of babies and career building. Now, at 52, I’m on the cusp of becoming an empty nester. It’s a bittersweet time, to be sure, but I hope to make the most of my newfound freedom as I enjoy the wonderful young adults my babies have become. One of the gifts of getting older is a sense of perspective—I find myself more grateful for the many good things in my life, with health being…

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11 min
the share

POP IT There’s a new toy in town and it’s not just for kids. “Popping” the bubbles on this silicone game can be fun and surprisingly satisfying, especially for those who twiddle with objects to stay focused. And while the activity evokes feel-good nostalgia from childhood of popping Bubble Wrap, it may also be beneficial for both children and grown-ups. After analyzing answers from 91 adults who regularly use fidget toys, researchers found that these gadgets can be linked to self-regulation of creativity, focus, and calm, according to a 2016 study published in the Association for Computing Machinery’s Digital Library. Q+A 4 Questions for Mandy Moore The actor, new mom, and Garnier spokesperson chatted with Health about her latest beauty habits and skin-care regimen. What products have you been using since giving birth to your…

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7 min
the healthy-skin playbook

AH, YOUTH Time to start good routines and focus on prevention. Congratulations—you’ve made it through puberty and your hormones are likely balancing themselves out (whew!), resulting in a relatively clear complexion devoid of fine lines and wrinkles. But that doesn’t mean you can slack on skin care, because this is when collagen starts to degrade, says Harold Lancer, MD, a dermatologist in Beverly Hills and founder of the eponymous skin-care brand. After the age of 20, the skin-firming protein decreases at a rate of about 1 percent per year—it’s up to you to practice healthful habits so that decline doesn’t accelerate. Avoid excess sun exposure and eating too much sugar, up your water intake, and curate a skin-care regimen you’ll be consistent with. INGREDIENTS TO INCORPORATE: SPF Ask any derm and they’ll tell you that…

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3 min
it’s a family affair

When I was a little girl, I loved to play with my ant farm, to “direct” my sister and brother in dramatic skits (there are hours of VHS footage to prove it), and to watch my mom, Sally, put on her makeup in the passenger seat of the car (we were almost always late for church, but Mom’s blue eyeshadow was pristine!). My mother and both of my grandmas are/were glamorous ladies, and I credit them not only for steering me into my career but also for teaching me about self-care and confidence. I’m highlighting just a few of the lessons I learned from them, and I hope it gets you thinking about the people who positively shaped your relationship with beauty. BEAUTY DIRECTOR 1 Lessons From My Mom My mother sells Mary…

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6 min
smooth moves

MOBILITY HAS BECOME a bit of a buzzword in fitness, but it’s more than just a trendy method for moving better. “It’s your ability to achieve and control a certain range of motion,” says New York City–based physical therapist and trainer Laura Miranda, DPT, CSCS, founder of Pursuit, the fitness training system. “In order to perform daily activities or simply function pain-free long-term, you need to find ways to properly work through full arcs of motion.” That’s why Miranda (pictured here) created this flow: to help bridge the gap between how much range you should have and how much you actually have. In the routine, you move from one pose to the next, holding each for two to three seconds and focusing on the entire body, from the neck and shoulders…

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6 min
take it to heart

Q: Sometimes I feel like my heart skips a beat. Should I be worried? A: Heart palpitations can range from merely annoying to serious. The feeling of your heart occasionally skipping in your chest is often just a blip in its rhythm, which can cause an “extra beat” that’s felt as a skipping, pounding, or fluttering. Some people feel this extra beat; others may not even notice it. Stress, caffeine, spicy foods, strenuous exercise, energy drinks, alcohol, and some medications can trigger palpitations, as can hormonal changes during pregnancy or menopause. In some cases, however, palpitations may be a sign of atrial fibrillation, a condition where the heart’s chambers beat out of coordination, causing a type of arrhythmia; they could also point to more serious heart issues, like heart disease. It’s…

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