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homestyle

homestyle February/March 2019

homestyle is New Zealand’s freshest home and lifestyle magazine. With a focus on clever ideas and intelligent spending, homestyle offers a mix of accessible luxury and practical inspiration giving you the confidence to create your own living environment with a personal touch. From new homes, to renovations and even rentals, homestyle is the magazine for anyone looking to transform their house into a home.

Country:
New Zealand
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Pluto Group Ltd
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6 Issues

In this issue

1 min.
editor’s note

I’ve never been particularly good at making New Year’s resolutions. Something about committing to a ‘new year, new you’ mandate never quite flies with me during the holiday break, when my days aren’t bound to the rigours of a publishing schedule and I’m busy enjoying those few precious weeks off work. In fact, February’s been known to roll around before I finally find the perfect diary to fill with best-laid plans for the months ahead! This year, my intention is to do things differently. I bought my new diary before Christmas, got the list-making underway, and am putting my best foot forward and carving out time to consider my goals and decide which ones are worth trying to achieve. Why am I telling you all this? After noting the slew of self-help…

1 min.
copy that

2 min.
scout

TWO FOR TWO From her former digs in Sydney, Lucy Coote of Salad Days Ceramics has moved to Wellington and is making her vessels from a new studio while raising twin toddlers. Her dual methods see her pair the freedom of hand-building with the more precise nature of wheel-throwing, always with a focus on tactility and everyday function. saladdaysceramics.com QUICK QUESTION What do you see when you look at this Islas de Aroha woven throw? If your answer’s floating islands amid shapes representing waka and vases, you’ve got it. Designed by Rakai Karaitiana of Napier studio Feather & Peace, it’s 100% cotton and, handily, can be machine washed and tumble-dried. feathersandpeace.myshopify.com ROCK STARS The hits just keep coming from UK designer Tom Dixon, who’s now doing these chic Rock candleholders as part of his Green Forest series…

1 min.
top shelf

A Tree in the House by Annabelle Hickson, published by Hardie Grant, $55. Who can say what gives a well-timed bouquet of flowers its extraordinary ability to ignite the heart? What we do know is that vases of cut blooms have a similar effect on a room. In A Tree in the House, writer, photographer and escaper of the city Annabelle Hickson shows how to make rustic arrangements, centrepieces and installations for yourself and others. She and her family moved to a pecan orchard in NSW’s Dumaresq Valley, and a turning point in her unexpectedly challenging journey was when she began filling their home with foraged flowers and foliage. In this book, she intersperses her guides to making whimsical floral creations with inspiring notes on a simplified life lived in connection…

1 min.
in brief

Petite Places , published by Gestalten, $100. Caves, huts, teepees, igloos, poor poets’ garrets… small-space living is nothing new and if history has taught us anything, it’s that it can be heaven or hell. The rad modern properties profiled in Petite Places offer idea after idea for making a tiny house of today the former. The Noma Guide to Fermentation by René Redzepi and David Zilber, published by Artisan, $90. You’ll know Nordic restaurant Noma as the king of gastronomic invention, but did you know each of its dishes includes some form of fermentation? Here two of the eatery’s chefs explore techniques in delicious — if a bit whiffy — detail, and share recipes and uses so culinary adventurers can try this at home. Northern Comfort , published by Gestalten, $100. Because, like you, we…

1 min.
okay coral

We have to confess we initially had our doubts about Living Coral. Sure, it’s pretty and playful, but how well does it work in real life? Turns out the answer is really well, and once our eyes were opened, we didn’t need much convincing — there’s a plethora of covetable pieces out there. And places too, like Breadway Bakery (pictured above) in Odessa, Ukraine, which pitches coral against pink, peach, cobalt, black, white, gold and grey to spectacular effect. GET THE LOOK Incorporating coral into your home can be as easy as refreshing a piece of furniture with a coat of paint. This low-cost, high- impact way of adding a shot of confidence and optimism to your interior has the benefit of allowing you to select exactly the shade you want.…