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HousesHouses

Houses Issue 120 February 2018

For the architect, designer, home owner, home builder or anyone simply interested in the best residential design, every issue of Houses tells the story of inspirational homes, their surrounds and the products that complete them. Through generous pictorial coverage from leading photographers, floor plans and lists of selected products, you share the delight of each home presented. You’ll also meet some of the creative people who designed them and keep up with the latest design trends and issues. Be inspired!

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Architecture Media Pty Ltd
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
welcome

I try to escape the city most weekends – there is nothing better than recharging in nature. But to enjoy these natural environments we need to look after them, and building in them adds another layer of responsibility. This year’s Australian contribution to the Venice Biennale is under the creative direction of Baracco and Wright (profiled in Houses 119) with artist Linda Tegg. Entitled Repair, the exhibition will create a physical dialogue between architecture and endangered plant communities to showcase Australian architecture that engages with rehabilitation of the natural environment. It’s heartening to discover that the clients of many projects in this issue are giving back to the sites on which their houses stand. CHROFI’s Lune de Sang Pavilion (page 58) in northern New South Wales is part of an intergenerational venture…

access_time1 min.
contributors

WRITER David Clark David has worked in the interior design industry for more than thirty years. He was editor-in-chief of Vogue Living Australia (2003–2012) and in 2012 he was International Editorial Consultant to Condé Nast for the launch of AD China. In 2016 he was inducted into the Design Institute of Australia’s Hall of Fame. PHOTOGRAPHER Cathy Schusler Cathy is a photographer who regularly collaborates with architects and interior designers. Her experience living in Japan for over a decade and her Australian upbringing and love of nature inform every aspect of her work. PHOTOGRAPHER Tanja Milbourne, TM Photo Tanja is a professional photographer with more than ten years’ experience. Her passion for architecture and the built environment has seen her work widely published and exhibited. WRITER Ricky Ray Ricardo Ricky is a writer and graduate of landscape architecture who has worked…

access_time4 min.
fresh finds

01 Yuh lamp collection The Yuh collection, designed by Gam Fratesi for Louis Poulsen, includes a wall, floor and table lamp. Inspired by the iconic AJ lamp by Arne Jacobsen, the lamps are flexible, take up very little space and provide direct glare-free downward light. cultdesign.com.au 02 Bump collection The Bump collection by Tom Dixon features minimalist, borosilicate vessels designed for tea making, mixology and floral arrangements. Each piece is delicately handmade with subtle levels of pink and grey tonal translucency. dedece.com 03 First chair Designed and manufactured in Melbourne, the First chair by Apparentt is a modern merger of thin powdercoated tubular steel and ergonomically formed plywood. Its light “line drawing-like” frame is robust and stackable. catapultdesign.net.au 04 Compile shelving system A simple design that allows for a number of possible permutations, Muuto’s Compile shelving system…

access_time3 min.
bookshelf

Small House Living Australia: Smart design in homes of 90 m2 or less BY Catherine Foster (Penguin Random House Australia, 2017) PP 240 • RRP $39.99 A sequel of sorts to Catherine Foster’s previous Small House Living effort, looking at projects in New Zealand, this book celebrates the primacy of the small. It presents diverse projects designed across Australia, from witty insertions on tiny infill sites to secondary dwellings in suburban backyards. While an introduction discusses the environmental and social benefits of building small, Foster is not evangelical here; rather, she lets the architecture speak for itself. Alexandria Duplex by David Langston-Jones Architect, for instance, is an accomplished example of what good architecture can achieve on a small, difficult block. David Weir Architects’ Exploding! Shed House also makes the most of an…

access_time3 min.
markowitz design

There’s an intimate relationship between Adam Markowitz and timber that makes his handcrafted furniture special. That and the hours spent dreaming, drawing, carving and testing each design until it becomes what it is destined to be. Adam’s focus is on making products that tell a story, honour the materials, have meaning for the maker and the user and, ideally, will be handed down through the generations. Markowitz Design is currently in the Meat Market Arts House in North Melbourne, where Adam works alongside other woodworkers. He started the studio in 2014 while working for a small architecture practice. It was at this time that he created the Fred table, which celebrates Australian timbers and evokes the modernist simplicity he encountered while studying in Denmark. Adam has studied in Melbourne, Tasmania, Denmark, the…

access_time5 min.
two halves house by moloney architects

“The owner-builder’s attention to detail has been exacting, with the plucky duo finding more than one opportunity to refine the design in the actual building process.” Two Halves House, outside Ballarat in Victoria, is a study of measure and balance against careful siting. But the house might never have existed if it were not for the ability of Moloney Architects to effectively share inspiration and open a dialogue with its clients, allowing them to explore their full range of options. The couple, who own and built the Two Halves House, had initially engaged Mick and Jules Moloney to renovate a house in central Ballarat – a project with a relatively modest budget. But after the architects invited them to visit a project that they were completing, they abandoned the renovation in…

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