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Landscape Architecture AustraliaLandscape Architecture Australia

Landscape Architecture Australia Issue 159 August 2018

Landscape Architecture Australia is an authoritative and contemporary record of landscape architecture, urban design and land-use planning in Australia, presenting independent reviews of public, commercial and residential work, plus commissioned comment on contemporary issues. The official magazine partner of the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Architecture Media Pty Ltd
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4 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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contributors

Mauro Baracco Mauro Baracco is a practicing architect and a director of Baracco and Wright Architects. He has a PhD in architecture from RMIT University, where he is an associate professor in the School of Architecture and Design. Annette Condello Annette Condello is a senior lecturer in architecture at Curtin University’s School of Design and the Built Environment. She will present a paper on the work of architectural design studio Lot-ek at the forthcoming MoMoWo Conference in Turin, Italy. Tanya Court Tanya Court is a landscape architect, artist and program director of landscape architecture at the University of Adelaide. She recently completed a PhD at RMIT University titled “The Site Re-presented: Everyday civic landscapes.” Dermot Foley Dermot Foley is a horticulturalist, landscape architect and director of Dermot Foley Landscape Architects, based in Dublin and London. He is…

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perspective

We open our August issue with a review by Jillian Walliss of Perth’s recently completed Yagan Square, a much-anticipated part of the reunification of Perth’s CBD and its night-life/entertainment district, historically separated from each other by railway lines (page 16). Zoe Myers considers another public square, also in Perth but to the city’s north-east, Railway Square (page 42). While contexts and ambitions differ, the role of the design of the public realm in the collective reshaping of relationships, perspectives and identity is examined in both. Both pieces also draw attention to the reality that the meaningful integration of a square into the daily life of a community over time often hinges on more than the physical details of its design. Ricky Ray Ricardo speaks with Jocelyn Chiew, the force behind much…

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noticeboard

BRISBANE’S OXLEY CREEK DRAFT MASTERPLAN UNVEILED The Brisbane City Council has released a draft masterplan for the redevelopment of the polluted Oxley Creek. The creek and its surrounds have a long history of agriculture, extractive mining, industrial uses, illegal dumping and wastewater treatment operations. The proposal aims to transform the waterway into a fifteen-kilometre green corridor and recreational parkland that will function as both a sanctuary for wildlife and an “urban playground.” The masterplan was prepared by Oxley Creek Transformation, the wholly council-owned company charged with guiding the vision for the area, with Brisbane studio Lat27. Image: Lat27 and Oxley Creek Transformation oxleycreek.com.au AILA LAUNCHES 2018 INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE The Australian Institute of Landscape Architects has launched the website for its 2018 International Festival of Landscape Architecture, which will take place on the…

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2018 national awards for planning excellence

The Planning Institute of Australia (PIA) held its 2018 National Awards for Planning Excellence ceremony in Perth on 9 May, awarding people and projects from around Australia for outstanding achievements in planning. New South Wales and Western Australia received the highest number of awards across the program’s twelve categories, with five in New South Wales and four in Western Australia. Elizabeth Quay took out the 2018 Great Place award with the jury lauding the project for transforming a significant waterfront site into a “true cultural landmark” that has considered “how the area would evolve over time and how it would positively contribute to the economic and social development of Perth.” The Hobart Waterfront Renewal project received a commendation in the same category. In the From Plan to Place category regional Western Australian project…

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an everyday civic

Yagan Square Perth, Western Australia Aspect Studios with Lyons Architecture and Iredale Pedersen Hook Since the early 1990s, the ambitions of Reconciliation have evolved from addressing the misunderstandings of Australian history and race relations to instigating policies and practices that encourage relationships and dialogue between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. The opening of Perth’s Yagan Square in March 2018 completes a trifecta of post-millennium squares conceived within this shifting framing of Reconciliation; it was preceded by Melbourne’s Federation Square (2002) and the transformation of Adelaide’s Victoria Square/Tarntanyangga (Stage 1 – 2013). Collectively these spaces speak to shifting notions of national identity, Reconciliation and civic life. This latest addition forms a critical piece of Perth’s decade-long City Link redevelopment plan, which aims to address the separation of the city centre from Northbridge by sinking railway infrastructure…

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jocelyn chiew: shaping the future campus

Education is big business in Australia. The surging $28 billion sector1 is now the third largest national export after iron ore and coal, with the onshore international education sector forecast to grow from 650,000 enrolments to 940,000 by 2025. The rapid growth has put enormous strain on existing campuses, and university-wide masterplans and large-scale projects have been a dominant feature in Australian architecture and landscape architecture during the past ten to fifteen years. Working at the coalface is Jocelyn Chiew, Manager of Campus Design, Quality and Planning, in the Buildings and Property Division at Australia’s largest university, Monash University. Chiew is not only a trained landscape architect, but also a registered architect and urban designer. Chiew initially intended to be a veterinarian and was studying science before she turned to architecture. While she…

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