EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Cars & Motorcycles
Mountain Biking AustraliaMountain Biking Australia

Mountain Biking Australia November - December 2017 - January 2018

Mountain Biking Australia is 'the' magazine for enduro, trail-riding and cross-country mountain bikers. Written by experienced riders who know what they’re on about, Mountain Biking Australia features detailed, critical analysis of new bikes, parts, clothing and nutrition. The five in-depth bike tests in each issue give great insight beyond the manufacturers’ marketing spin. Brilliant photography gets you up close and personal with the all new gear. There are mechanical ‘how-to’ tips to help you maintain your gear, and technical riding pointers to help you ride better. A great read for MTBers the world over. Download your copy now!

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Yaffa Publishing Group PTY LTD
Read Morekeyboard_arrow_down
BUY ISSUE
$7.70(Incl. tax)
SUBSCRIBE
$30.80(Incl. tax)
4 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
thankyou & goodnight

(Photo: www.rideaus.com)They say that all good things must come to an end, and for me that time has finally come.It's 15 years since I started Mountain Biking Australia magazine and this will be the final issue with me as the editor. I will be moving on to a new and very different career, and while my new job won't revolve around bikes, I'll still be riding as much as possible and contributing with reviews and other articles—rest assured that you’ll still find my ramblings within these pages.Working at Mountain Biking Australia has been both challenging and rewarding. It has taken me to some amazing places and I’ve met friends who’ll be with me for life; I even met my wife Amber while working here—it really has shaped my life in…

access_time3 min.
winning letter

Crank Brothers CandyLess than a year ago, my son got me into MTB riding. For my 70th birthday I treated myself to a new Norco Fluid 7.1 Plus dual suspension bike. With it I'm using Shimano clipless pedals which I swapped across from my older second hand hardtail. While I'd been using the SH56 dual release cleats, I recently changed to SH51 single release cleats as I occasionally popped out of the pedals when bunny hopping over an obstacle.This cleat change also made me look at other pedal systems including those from Crank Brothers, so when I saw your review of the Candy pedals in the last magazine, I read it with interest. From reading forums, I found that people seem to have trouble with releasing from these pedals—if their…

access_time4 min.
mud clearance

Life LessonsI am a 50 year old teacher and I work with adolescents with learning difficulties in their transition from school to work. I often use my mountain biking experiences to reach these guys, so I decided to put these down to share.1. You ride where your eyes look: If you focus on the roots and rocks you end up there. If you focus on the path between the roots and rocks you get through. In life if you focus on your goals you’ll get there, if you focus on the barriers they will seem impossible to get past.2. Momentum is your friend: Use momentum to get over logs and don’t apply the brakes every time there is a challenge on the track. In life, when things are tough keep…

access_time4 min.
ask the experts

STICKY FORKI just got my first hardtail mountain bike— it’s a Trek and love it to bits. However, the RockShox suspension fork that came as factory standard has a ‘grippy feel’ rather than a smooth frictionless glide. Grease doesn’t seem to make it feel any better and my local bike shop has told me to keep riding it and see what happens. Any suggestions?Sam TrundleSome new forks can have a slightly ‘sticky’ feel for the first few rides and it can take a little while for them to free up. Low-end forks with a smooth chrome steel finish may have more ‘stiction’ than a mid-to-upper end fork too—this could be what you are feeling, so the shop’s suggestion may be fair.Give the fork some time to bed in and you…

access_time3 min.
quick releases

Maydena on the MovePreviously we've reported on the trail project at Maydena in Tasmania and trail builders Dirt Art have now released details on their park membership packagesTrail-wise, Maydena is set to open on January 26th and will kick off with 30km of gravity trails. An additional 90km is in the works, so this project really is huge. From the summit down, Maydena will offer 820m of descending – that's getting on for twice the elevation loss you'll find at Queenstown in New Zealand!To access the summit, you'll need to jump on a shuttle bus. These will run daily from 10am until 4pm through September to the end of May (it may run until 7pm at times for 'extended play' sessions). From June until the end of August shuttles will…

access_time9 min.
latest dirt

ENTITY MP15Weighing just 275g for the pair, the Entity MP15 is amongst the lightest clipless MTB pedals on the market—that’s lighter than Shimano XTR crosscountry pedals. Aside from the minimal weight, they feature a robust alloy body, a CNC machined chromoly spindle and a sealed bearing on the outer end. There’s also loads of mud clearance and the release tension is adjustable. The supplied cleats are SPD compatible and offer six-degrees of lateral float. All these specs sound solid enough but the price really helps them stand out; they sell for just $40 a pair!www.bicyclesonline.com.auSCHWALBE WIDE TRAILIn addition to the new Addix rubber compounds (see our review PXX), Schwalbe has also released a new 2.6 inch width in their Rocket Ron and Nobby Nic models. Many modern bikes now come…

help