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Photo Review June - August 2018

Inspiring photography, practical tips and useful information for photographers at all levels. Easy to follow advice on everything from buying the right camera gear through to shooting, editing, printing and organising your photos. The Inspiration section features high quality images and insight into how the best photographers create their photos.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Media Publishing Pty Limited
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4 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

3 min.
that’s not how i remember it

The moon is the worst. Month in and month out, every full moon generates untold thousands of disappointed snapshooters all over the world. It had looked so big and beautiful coming up over a beautiful landscape, or a city skyline or even a suburban backyard still aglow in the twilight. But now, as a picture, it’s nothing more than a tiny, featureless, white dot and a stark reminder that photographs are not the same as memories. In his book The Forgetting Machine: Memory, Perception, and the ‘Jennifer Aniston Neuron’, neuroscientist Rodrigo Quian Quiroga argues that perception and memory are so entwined that they’re closer to being a whole rather than two separate phenomena. What you perceive is transformed by the process of being added to your memory and what you remember is…

9 min.
ripples

‘You're not thinking about what ISO am I on and that sort of thing. You’re just doing.’ ‘I’m not one given to the grand narrative about how I picked up a camera the moment I finished suckling at my mother’s breast,’ said South African born and raised Clayton Hairs. ‘I don’t come from an artistic family. While I probably had inclinations to the artistic side, I had quite a domineering father and I was always aware of his, “how are you going to make a living mate” attitude to career choices. So I did undergraduate things that I really didn’t care much for – and which, quite frankly, took me far too long to actually complete. ‘When I finished my undergraduate studies, I decided to buy an old 1976 Land Rover and…

8 min.
wedded to the moment

‘We have amazing cameras now, but it still takes skill to capture those very fast moments when everything is perfect.’ We all know what wedding photos look like. But yours don’t look like that. Can you explain why? Right from the start, I didn’t know what I liked, but I knew what I didn’t like. The photography you do and the style you end up doing is a representation of who you are inside. I’m a very genuine sort of person and I love capturing real, raw emotion in a moment. You know what [pioneering French street photographer] Henri Cartier-Bresson called ‘the decisive moment’? In the wedding context, I prefer to call them peak moments, and they’re very important to me because most people can’t catch them. We have amazing cameras now, but it…

7 min.
muogamarra nature reserve

‘For nature lovers, it’s hard to find an area with so many iconic plants in their native environment.’ Why visit? Muogamarra Nature Reserve, which is located within easy reach of Sydney and the NSW Central Coast, covers the remains of a volcano. The park sits astride a hilltop overlooking the Hawkesbury River with good views of the Brooklyn Bridge and Berowra Creek. People flock to the park when it opens to the public in spring to see a spectacular display of wildflowers endemic to the Hawkesbury sandstone environment. For nature lovers, it’s hard to find an area with so many iconic plants in their native environment. More than 900 species of plants live in the park, an extraordinary number given its relatively small size and proximity to the city. Expect to see tall Gymea…

7 min.
how important are megapixels?

Hasselblad's announcement of a medium format camera that could capture 400-megapixel images got us thinking: are the 'megapixel wars' of a decade ago really over? And how many photographers would actually need such high resolution? (Very few, we suspect.) Recently, most camera manufacturers have promoted features other than resolution when advertising cameras, although most consumers still check the megapixel count of cameras before they buy. So why do we obsess about megapixel counts and ignore other, often more important, features? And with more pictures being taken with smartphones and shared via social media, how much do megapixels matter? Megapixels resonate because numbers are easy to understand and quantitative measures are difficult to dispute. High megapixel counts imply superiority because we're conditioned to believe that more of something is always better. Unfortunately, little thought…

1 min.
'better' pixels

If you view each photosite on a sensor as a bucket that collects in-coming light, it's obvious that the larger the bucket the more light it can collect. More light collected means a higher signal-to-noise ratio, which means you obtain more image data to work with relative to the unavoidable background noise level. This makes it easy to see why larger photosites are preferable to more photosites for a given sensor area. Photosites with larger surface areas will provide more usable image data to work with. The table below compares the latest cameras from the leading manufacturers, separated by sensor size. The M4/3 cameras are identified in yellow, cameras with APS-C sized sensors are shown in blue while those with 'full frame' (35mm sized) sensors are grouped on an orange background. Out…