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Slam SkateboardingSlam Skateboarding

Slam Skateboarding 213

Slam has been at the forefront of Australian skateboarding for nearly three decades and is the country’s leading and longest serving and skateboarding publication. Experience Slam Magazine on PC Desktop, Mac, iPad, iPhone and via all Android capable devices. Created by skateboarders for skateboarders.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Silver Lining Media Pty Ltd
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3 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
introduction

Welcome to our summer edition. The heat has hit, and the southern states that were slammed by what felt like an exceedingly long winter have finally been offered some respite. In line with our pursuit to showcase the best skateboarding in each major Australian city [Sydney – Slam 210, and Melbourne – Slam 211], we’re heading north for this issue to the capital of Queensland, where it’s always warm in sunny Brisbane. I’m originally from Brissy, so I hold a special place in my heart for the city. I spent the majority of my late teenage years skating all over the CBD and a splay of spots in the outer suburbs. Red Tile plaza was the thriving hub back in those days, and the likes of Aaron Jenkin, Nick Collerson and Scotty…

access_time3 min.
thank you brian anderson

As you are all aware by now, Brian Anderson is gay. He publicly announced his sexual orientation to the world in October 2016 via a video interview conducted by Vice Sports, which featured testimonials from some of BA’s closest colleagues and friends. The interview definitely attracted attention beyond skateboarding, but it also proved that skateboarding can unanimously congratulate and celebrate Brian’s homosexuality. I’m from Sydney, and like any Sydneysider, I’m no stranger to homosexuality. Whether you like it or not, homosexuality is a key ingredient to Sydney’s overall vibrancy, diversity and livelihood. We’re famous for the Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras, and our city rightfully celebrates and respects its homosexual residents. Along with the rest of the community, Sydney skateboarders are, for the most part, completely down with homosexuality. Although BA’s announcement…

access_time5 min.
postcards from phnom penh

At the entrance of Wat Botum park in Phnom Penh, street vendors are barbecuing meat, frying noodles and stocking eskies with cans of beer, readying themselves for the evening’s customers. It’s a humid 32 degrees in Cambodia’s bustling capital, and motorbikes zoom past with friendly honks and splutters of smoke. Across the road, the city’s local shredders are gathering at the country’s first and only skate shop, aptly named ‘The Skateshop Phnom Penh’. It looks just like any decent board supplier in Australia, with decks hanging from the walls; trucks, wheels and hardware neatly displayed beneath the glass counter; and a flat-screen TV showing skate vids in a constant loop. The shop homies are steadily rocking up, sipping cold drinks, chatting in Khmer (their native tongue) and waiting for the…

access_time7 min.
women in skateboarding

Skateboarding has always had an alternative culture to mainstream ‘sports’ like footy and cricket. While there’s probably just as much sweat and Gatorade in skateboarding these days, we’ve got more blood than boxing and more conflict with cops than actual criminals do. These aspects of skateboarding generally mean it’s considered a masculine thing, but an alternative masculinity to the one at footy games and UFC fights. Masculinity is still masculinity, though, and skateboarding doesn’t have a reputation for being overly inclusive to women. The lack of women in skateboarding is starkly visible at every park and street spot. In fact, if there’s a woman in sight of these places, it’s often assumed that she’s someone’s girlfriend or mum. While skate culture boasts a reputation for bringing people of all ages, nationalities…

access_time3 min.
specifics

EMERICA MADE CHAPTER TWO GIVEAWAY Emerica has a long history of superior skateboarding videos with befitting soundtracks and a high level of quality control. Made Chapter Two, yet again, sees the brand strengthen its cinematic legacy and push the ever-increasing bar for street skateboarding worldwide. It’s a bloody banger, and the B-sides are equally amazing – look ’em up. In celebration of the release of Made Chapter Two, we’ve got a special prize pack up for grabs. We’re giving you the chance to take home a pair of limited edition Made Chapter Two Figueroa kicks, a limited Baker x Emerica deck, plus a hoody, tee, cap, and the film on DVD. To get your hands on this glorious box of goodness, tell us in roughly 25 words or less, who has your…

access_time16 min.
brisbane skateboarding

Brisbane; Brissy; Brisvegas – whatever you want to call it – there’s something rather attractive about this big city of ours. Despite the fast-paced hustle and bustle, lack of parking and crowded spaces, I find myself inherently drawn to Queensland’s quirky concrete jungle; and free Wi-Fi. Brissy was once a mecca for Australian skateboarding, producing some of the best skateboarders, filmers and photographers; most of whom have since moved on to bigger stages, assumed a life beyond skateboarding or simply bowed out. The city boasted spots that would arouse the interests of even the most loyal interstate patriots. Red Tile, King George Square, Footbridge and Bankers were all treasured gems that are now somewhat defunct. Brisbane has not been blessed with longstanding, non-bust, uncapped plazas like our interstate counterparts. You can barely…

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