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Retro Gamer

Retro Gamer

No. 219
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Retro Gamer is the only magazine in the UK that’s fully dedicated to the halcyon days of classic gaming. If you’ve ever fondly blasted away at the Bydo Empire in R-Type, swung Bowser by the tail in Super Mario 64, or navigated all 20 levels of Matthew Smith’s Manic Miner, then this is the magazine for you. Created by a dedicated team of experts, Retro Gamer’s mission is to deliver constantly engaging and passionately written articles that cover a wide range of subjects. We offer our readership in-depth looks at classic games and franchises, behind-the-scenes glimpses of the software houses from yesteryear, and one-on-one exclusive interviews with industry veterans such as Archer Maclean and Hideo Kojima. Stylish, entertaining and beautifully presented, Retro Gamer is the ultimate guide to videogaming’s rich and diverse history.

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Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
Frequency:
Monthly
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13 Issues

in this issue

2 min.
the retrobates

DARRAN JONES I think it has to be Sin & Punishment. When I covered the game for gamesTM, people couldn’t believe it was running on an N64. It looked that good. Expertise: Juggling a gorgeous wife, two beautiful girls, a SNES-loving cousin and an award-winning magazine, all under one roof! Currently playing: Rogue Legacy Favourite game of all time: Strider ANDY SALTER I think the only Treasure game I’ve played is Light Crusader and I don’t really remember anything about. So it’s my favourite by default I guess. Expertise: Modding games, no ‘vanilla’ versions for me, thanks! Currently playing: M&B2: Bannerlord Favourite game of all time: Rome: Total War GRAEME MASON I have very fond memories of Light Crusader, one of Treasure’s lesser known games. It’s so ethereal and beautiful, complete with a wonderful soundtrack. Expertise: Adjusting the tape azimuth with a…

1 min.
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During the Nineties I regularly found myself on both sides of the console war, mainly because I’d often alternate between the Mega Drive and SNES and would promote each one accordingly. When I was team Mega Drive one of the biggest weapons you could wield against SNES owners was Treasure. The developer’s output on Sega’s 16-bit console was phenomenally strong and I’d often cite the likes of Gunstar Heroes, Alien Soldier and Dynamite Headdy as solid reasons for being on team Sega. Its output on the next generation was equally good and the likes of Radiant Silvergun and Guardian Heroes not only earned high acclaim, but highlighted just how good pixel-based art could look on 32-bit machines. It’s a huge thrill then to be able to not only revisit Treasure’s catalogue of…

6 min.
kreating kombat

The original Mortal Kombat movie from 1995 is something of an outlier amongst Hollywood adaptations of videogames. As a decently enjoyable watch that represented its source material faithfully, it was considered for a long time to be arguably the best videogame movie. In fact, all of the videogame movies that outrank Mortal Kombat on Rotten Tomatoes have been released in the last three years. The movie remains popular with fans, and it can be hard to compete with that sort of nostalgic fondness, but Mortal Kombat has already successfully rebooted once before – the 2011 videogame introduced a revamped fighting model and coupled it with a cinematic story mode that renewed focus on classic characters. Ten years on, we’re about to see if director Simon McQuoid will achieve similar success…

3 min.
retro impotency

How’s your lockdown currently going? As we approach a year of this misery, I have found myself going slowly mad. Or maybe I’m rapidly descending into insanity, who knows? My latest example of potential downward spiral is I’ve been feeling guilty about my retro collection. It’s not huge, but it’s decent and it cost a fair few quid. It was expensive because a lot of my machines are modded, with flash cards. For a long time I was a purist and felt you needed to have the actual cartridge or disc but I don’t like clutter so I thought this was the way to go. Why the guilt? I hope you’re asking, otherwise me sneaking that line in was pointless. Well, it’s because I don’t play them. My N64, Beeb, Dreamcast,…

3 min.
lightning in a bottle

The Nineties. Remember those? Going into that decade, I had little inkling that – for better and sometimes worse – I’d come out the other end having carved out my own small footnote in gaming history. I am of course talking about Digitiser, the daily gaming magazine I co-created and wrote, as Mr Biffo, for just over ten years, from 1993 to 2003. For those of you who may not know, it ran in the UK on a service called Teletext. Confusingly, the medium was also called teletext (lower case ‘t’), and it was a sort of proto-internet, that could be accessed through TVs. Even before I began working for Teletext – initially as a graphic designer – I had been a fan of teletext. I was an avid reader of Teletext’s…

6 min.
war reinvented

Few strategy games are as beloved as the Total War series. Rome: Total War was originally released in 2004, but Creative Assembly has now decided to update the strategy classic for a new generation as Total War: Rome Remastered. We spoke to Kevin McDowell (who was involved with the 2004 original) and Feral Interactive’s Tom Massey to find out more. How did you become involved with the first Total War game? Kevin McDowell: I joined Creative Assembly in early 2000 – they were mostly known for EA-published sports games in those days. At my interview I saw a pre-release version of Shogun, it looked right up my alley. In my personal sketchbook I had been doodling ideas of a similarly novel game in which you controlled large groups of soldiers on a…