EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Food & Wine
Southern LivingSouthern Living

Southern Living January 2019

SOUTHERN LIVING celebrates the legendary food, gracious homes, lush gardens, and distinct places that make the South unique. In every edition you’ll find dozens of recipes prepared in our famous test kitchens, guides to the best travel experiences, decorating ideas and inspiration, and gardening tips tailored specifically to your climate.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Meredith Corporation
Read Morekeyboard_arrow_down
SPECIAL: Save 75% on your subscription!
BUY ISSUE
$7.92(Incl. tax)
SUBSCRIBE
$31.74$7.93(Incl. tax)
12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
southern comfort

ONE OF THE hallmarks of being Southern is that we’re there for each other when it counts. We show up with flowers and casseroles when a new neighbor moves in or if a family suffers a loss. I saw this firsthand when my father-in-law passed away recently and home-cooked meals were delivered to us for a week. We’ve also had neighbors take care of our kids and our dog when emergencies have arisen, and we’ve returned the favor. It’s just what you do. When Hurricanes Florence and Michael hit the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts last fall, this Southern tradition took on epic proportions. Church groups swung into action, offering food and shelter to thousands who had been displaced. The Cajun Navy, Louisiana volunteers with an armada of jon boats, showed up…

access_time1 min.
the #seeher initiative

Southern Living and Meredith Corporation, our parent company, are teaming up with the #SeeHer initiative in an effort to eliminate bias against women and girls in advertising, media, and programming. The mission of #SeeHer is “to increase the percentage of accurate portrayals of women and girls in U.S. advertising and media by 20% by 2020, the 100th anniversary of women winning the right to vote.” For more information, visit seeher.com and meredith.com or follow them on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.…

access_time8 min.
pretty snug

WHEN IT COMES to a home, small should not mean claustrophobic. In fact, with a little help from thoughtful furnishings, color picks, and organizational tactics, even the quirkiest alcove can evolve into a beloved spot. Step one to opening up possibilities: Edit. Get rid of anything you don’t need; then create smart zones for everything you do. “When space and storage are limited, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed,” says Joanna Teplin, cofounder of Nashville’s The Home Edit. “By paring things down and utilizing creative solutions, you can really embrace the space you have.” Next, avoid visual clutter—think multitasking, small-boned furniture and well-chosen art. “Too many frames can make the walls feel like they’re closing in on you,” says Dallas interior designer Moll Anderson. “Focus on just one piece of colorful…

access_time1 min.
a regal charmer

WHY WE LOVE IT This 1,787-square-foot three-bedroom, two-bath house looks dressy only from the outside. Inside, it caters to a laid-back lifestyle. Step into a living room with views that extend through the kitchen to the almost 36-foot-wide back porch. (It’s meant to be treated like your good-weather family room!) A fixed staircase leads up to the attic, where you have the option of turning this 436-square-foot area into a bed and bath or using it for storage. (Every small-home owner dreams of having extra room for Christmas decor and off-season clothing.) Need more space? Stash things in the two-car garage. THE WOW FACTOR The handsome facade. The words “cottage” and “cute” are used nearly synonymously these days, but architect Mitch Ginn went beyond that small-home stereotype with this refined version. The redbrick…

access_time1 min.
age gracefully

Factor In Imperfections “I wanted this space to feel quirky yet functional,” says Gambrel, who placed the sink off-kilter in a corner. “This let me center the hood and fit in extra storage beside the sink.” Make Modern Concessions “While this room feels historic because of the architectural detailing, its open space, high ceiling, and broad doorways make it look relevant for today as well,” says Gambrel. Reflect Your Home’s Spirit “Let the exterior architecture inform the style of the kitchen,” says Gambrel. “This room should feel like a natural extension of the rest of the house—not an addition.” Finish Wisely “Using the same gray-blue color for cabinets and trim gives the cabinetry a sense of permanence, which is critical for creating the new-old-house effect,” says Gambrel. Enhance Its Character Large kitchen islands don’t fit into a historic-house aesthetic.…

access_time1 min.
scenes from south beach

Paint Picks Lighten up walls or furniture with a frothy new shade The Palette Lavender + Mint Green + White + French Blue PRODUCTS: COURTESY VENDORS; SCONCE: HECTOR MANUEL SANCHEZ…

help