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SunsetSunset

Sunset

February/March 2019

SUNSET celebrates your love of Western living. Discover new weekend and day trip destinations, inspiring homes and gardens, and fast and fresh recipes that highlight the West's great local ingredients. For annual or monthly subscriptions (on all platforms except iOS), your subscription will automatically renew and be charged to your provided payment method at the end of the term unless you choose to cancel. You may cancel at any time during your subscription in your account settings. If your provided payment method cannot be charged, we may terminate your subscription.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sunset Publishing Corporation
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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savor the view

BEHIND THE SCENES: ON LOCATION FOR THIS ISSUE’S COVER SHOOT AT HARBOR HOUSE INNHARBOR HOUSE is a modest inn with views that are anything but. Perched on the Pacific Coast outside of Mendocino, the 1916 property frames a rugged coastline pierced by spears of rock jutting from the ocean. The coast hasn’t changed much over the past century, but the culture around it sure has. In many ways, the 10-room lodge formed for us the perfect backdrop for a more contemporary story of West Coast success.In 2015, the sisters Ali and Sam Blatteis launched the Berkeley-based Home Base Spirits distillery, catapulting themselves into a gold rush of western whiskey production that has exploded over the past decade. We chose Home Base for our cover because their approach is decidedly western—they’re…

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new & now

Launch alert!Visit sunset.com/smarter for the latest home hacks, smart-home gadget reviews, and more.Spring escapesIn need of ideas for a spring getaway? Check out these ideal destinations for the season: sunset.com/springtrips.St. Patrick’s Day party menuFrom corned beef to colcannon, celebrate St. Paddy’s Day with our holiday menu for a crowd: sunset.com/stpatricksday.Top sources for plant seedsGet ready for spring planting with our go-to sources for seeds, both online and brick-and-mortar: sunset.com/shopseeds. ■…

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wild times

It’s no secret that Mexico City is a lightning rod for cutting-edge design and thrilling culinary innovation. So that’s where Lauren Bates, former chief marketing officer of UrbanStems, decamped a few years ago to decompress from her demanding start-up gig. Her big takeaway: creative, talented women across the city were launching some pretty cool businesses. Her new venture, Wild Terrains, shines a light on those female entrepreneurs, introducing intimate eight-person groups of women to buzzing female-run restaurants, shops, and experiences. Coming up: an International Women’s Day trip in March, a mother-and-daughter adventure in May, and a tempting Día de Los Muertos immersion at the end of October. From $1,850 for 5 days/4 nights; wildterrains.com.(LAUREN LOUISE PHOTOGRAPHY)Scenes from the CiudadSettle in, hit the street, then chill out.1. At Gina Lozada’s Ignacia…

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gardening clothes for women

Back in 2016, when Kate Day (at right above) and Kyle Marie Begley (at left) were running their own Portland-based landscaping company, one frustration kept rearing its head: a lack of gardening clothes made for women. “If the pants were great for working in, they didn’t look good,” remembers Day. “If they looked good, they didn’t stand up to the job.” Finding that other women echoed these sentiments, Begley and Day partnered with one of their clients, apparel designer Sara De-Luca, to found what would become Dovetail Workwear (dovetailworkwear.com). The result is a clothing line created for women, by women, with products that are comfortable, are good-looking, and can withstand the rigors of gardening or any other labor-intensive job. Best sellers include the sleek Maven Slim pant (worn by Begley…

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for keeps

You bring a reusable bag to the grocery store and you ditched plastic bottles for a reusable water canteen years ago. But there are plenty more ways to curb waste across your home, from the laundry room to the shower. Here’s our guide to kick-starting a nondisposable lifestyle.1. Enjoy iced coffee guilt-free with this stainless steel tumbler. $24; wildminimalist.com.2. Load up in the produce or bulk-bin aisle with these all-cotton bags. $10; june homesupply.com.3. Replace paper towels with this all-cotton napkin set, handwoven by artisans in Oaxaca, Mexico. Shown in Rust and Oatmeal. $65/set of 4; danahaim.com.4. Swap dryer sheets for naturalwool dryer balls, hand-felted in Sonoma County. $35/set of 5; ambatalia.com.5. Many cities and counties do not accept plastic utensils in the recycling bin. The bamboo variation is reusable…

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aw, shucks

You may think of oysters as a summer staple, but they are actually in season right now. According to lore, bivalves are at their finest during months with an “R”—basically any time from September to April. “West Coast oysters are in peak condition for eating raw in these colder months … they won’t be as spawny, and flavor profiles are going to be the best,” says Terry Sawyer, who runs Northern California’s Hog Island Oyster Co. with John Finger. With briny mollusks on the mind, we canvassed chefs around the West Coast for a selection of easy-to-make mignonettes that take freshly shucked gems to the next level.How to shuck oysters at homeShucking oysters is surprisingly easy once you get the hang of it. You only need two tools: an oyster…

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