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The Art of HealingThe Art of Healing

The Art of Healing Vol 1 Issue 66

The Art of Healing supports a holistic approach to wellness with a focus on the individual, and provides solutions that assists readers to lead a more responsible, conscious, and mindful life. Our aim is to deliver reliable information on how to attain and sustain optimal wellness, using the most natural means possible incorporating the physical, mental, emotional, spiritual, social and environmental aspects of wellbeing.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
LEGIT PUBLICATIONS
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4 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
questions to myself

Can you hold close to your bosom the knowing that all will change? With this understanding, do you have the courage and the faith to walk out into each new day? What choice do you have? You have borne the agony and the joy of impermanence. The response is clear – to face your life with either fear or allowing. Open your hands; let life flow through them. The primal urge to grasp is futile, like attempting to contain water in a sieve. It will not give you what you want or need. Feel the coming and the going; be exhilarated in the both. Delight in the dance of each precious present moment, float with the tides as they rise and fall, lovingly held up on the waves of time.…

access_time1 min.
contributors

FRONT COVER IMAGE BY: LUCY PIERCE Forest Protector with Sooty Owl and Leadbeaters Possum www.lucypierce.com Thank you to all the writers, organisations, and people we interviewed for their time and contributions to this magazine including (but not limited to): • Susan H Spence, Caroline Donovan, Sonja March• Professor Kylie O’Brien• Shannon Harvey• Beth Darnall• Carolyn Chilton Cassas• Harriet Birrell CORRECTION: Our sincerest apologies for our error in the art credit for our DEC/FEB 2019 magazine. The correct artist should have been Chris Hazell for this beautiful image called Learning To Fly. If you would like to see more of Chris’ work, please visit her on Instagram: @chrishazell artist. DISCLAIMER: All material provided in this magazine should be used as a guide only. Information provided should not be construed or used as a substitute for professional or medical…

access_time4 min.
editor’s note

I was going to begin this Editor’s Note by taking a big step back and making comment on ‘the world today.’ But then I realised, I am really not in a position to make a comment on this. I don’t watch TV, I don’t read mainstream newspapers (regularly enough), I don’t listen to radio. I do see some information come across my social media feed, but really, not enough to comment. And reflecting on this, I think it is important that I state this because all media should be understood within the context it is presented. The purpose of this magazine, is to inform and educate readers about health and healing alternatives. So the information you will read in this magazine, is from articles I have selected from the 17 years…

access_time2 min.
better diagnosis to improve breast cancer treatment

From 2019, the World Health Organisation will incorporate these guidelines into the fifth edition of the iconic; Blue Book, Classification of Tumours of the Breast. Research Fellow Dr Amy McCart Reed said the team which developed the guidelines specifically investigated metaplastic breast carcinomas (MBC), a rare but aggressive form of breast cancer. “Among patients with a bad tumour type like MBC, there are some who will do well and some will do poorly, and this new metric helps us to categorise this. “For patients with MBC, we found the number of different cell types in the tumours had a significant impact on survival,” Dr McCart Reed said. “The more diverse the tumour, the worse the patient’s prognosis is likely to be.” “Previously, the WHO guidelines have described the types of cancer cells within…

access_time1 min.
study finds 45 minutes of patient education improves chronic disease management

The study, entitled The Other 45 assigned 47 patients who were diagnosed with a chronic disease, like hypertension, COPD, or diabetes, to visit with a second-year medical student for 45 minutes after seeing their physician. That one-on-one session measurably improved patients' attitudes and abilities in self-managing their care. Patients also had subsequent follow-up appointments with the students at three weeks and three months after their initial session, and were assessed on a 40-point questionnaire. Results at both points demonstrated consistent improvement in patients' willingness and capacity to be able to self-manage their care. "Patients reported a greater understanding of their chronic disease and feeling better equipped to manage their health," said Alexis Stoner, Ph.D., director of Preventive Medicine and Public Health at Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine and lead author of…

access_time3 min.
pema chodron: a buddhist teaching on loneliness, rejection and a broken heart

In the midst of loneliness, in the midst of fear. In the middle of feeling misunderstood and rejected is the heartbeat of all things … the genuine heart of sadness. Just as a jewel that has been buried in the Earth for a million years is not discoloured or harmed, in the same way this noble heart is not affected by all of our kicking and screaming. The jewel can be brought out into the light at any time and it will glow as brilliantly as if nothing had ever happened. No matter how committed we are to unkindness, selfishness or greed, the genuine heart of bodhicitta [wakeful human nature] cannot be lost. It is here in all that lives, never marred and completely whole. We think that by protecting ourselves from…

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