The Art of Healing Vol 4 Issue 73

With so much publicity being given to fake news of late, we are very pleased to reassure you that our latest issue of The Art of Healing has lots of scientifically-based research articles to keep you informed and educated, and help you practice preventative health strategies in your life, along with accompanying beautiful imagery to lighten and hearten your soul – particularly over the colder Winter months. Highlights include Why Reading Good News Is Good For You; a few articles on Sleep and afternoon napping, which is linked to better mental agility; and some natural remedies for Restless Leg Syndrome. On the emotional side of things, we have a really useful article on how to release judgement, and also the difference between anxiety and Anxiety Disorder from one of the experts. And if you haven’t heard about the Tibetan Rites, don’t miss finding out about this. Doing these 7 exercise is an easy and effective way to keep fit and healthy – including as you age. Our Featured Artist this issue (and also our front cover artist), is Holly Wilmeth. Lots more .. including the Dirty Dozen and Clean Lists for 2021 (fruit & vege with the most and least pesticides).

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
LEGIT PUBLICATIONS
Frequency:
Quarterly
$8.25(Incl. tax)
$28(Incl. tax)
4 Issues

in this issue

1 min
contributors

FRONT COVER IMAGE: Purity ARTIST: Prida NyashaWEBSITE: pridenyasha.com ART PROFILE: p. 46-51 Thank you to all the writers, organisations, and people we interviewed for their time and contributions to this magazine including: • Charlotte Howells, Pan Macmillan Publishing • Jennifer Weber • Teri Lichtenstein • Dr Helena Popovic • Esha Oberoi • Dr Michael Mosley • Kirsty Noffke, Simon & Schuster WEBSITES YOU MIGHT LIKE TO VISIT: • stockapps.com • skillsoft.com • mindbodygreen.com • wakeup-world.com • neurosciencenews.com • greatergoodberkeley.edu • foodfrontier.org • sciencedaily.com Thanks so much to Matthew Johnstone for permission to republish images and text on p.41-45 from his book The Little Book of Resilience.…

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2 min
editor’s note

Hi again. How have you been going over the past three months? I know, very trying times in so many ways. There is so much uncertainty and change happening, it is very difficult to keep focussed and grounded sometimes – there are so many distractions! What I try to do is just keep looking for the positives in life, stay open to opportunities, and live in a conscious way such that when special moments come along, you are in a position to respond to them. I call this keeping in the flow. That’s my little tip for this issue … and another one that I just find so important in my life, is to engage with things that inspire you. I don’t know if I could go through a day…

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2 min
global fitness apps growing with users expecting to hit one billion

In general, fitness apps help users monitor their health and fitness. Some apps analyze calories burned while others review calorie intake and offer guidance on nutrition for staying healthy and fit. Historically, the use of fitness apps correlates with seasonal workout habits. However, in 2020 usage has spiked in the advent of the coronavirus pandemic when people have been compelled to stay at home. With gyms closed and authorities curbing the movement of people through lockdowns, apps are becoming a useful tool for working out at home. Developers in the fitness apps sector have come up with a different application to serve different purposes under workout routines, and exercises. The exercise and weight loss apps for example simplify the process of tracking daily calorie intake to a macronutrient level, such as fats…

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1 min
why you shouldn’t put coffee grounds directly on plants

“While coffee grounds contain a small amount of nitrogen, they are not actually fertilisers,” Leslie F. Halleck, M.S., a certified professional horticulturist explains. It turns out that coffee’s nitrogen, an essential nutrient that plants need to grow, is not readily available in the grounds immediately after brewing. In order to provide any real value to plants, these grounds need some time to break down in a compost pile. “Organic matter needs to be decomposed first (through composting) to make individual nutrients they hold available to plants,” Halleck says. Ironically enough, attempting to take a shortcut and place used grounds directly on soil can actually starve your plant of nitrogen in the long run. “As fresh organic matter begins to decompose through the decomposition cycle,” Halleck explains, “nitrogen can be immobilised by…

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2 min
australian workers eager for a focus on personal wellbeing post-covid

Research conducted online by YouGov between 30 July – 3 August 2020 comprised a nationally representative sample of 681 Australians, 758 Malaysians and 886 Singaporeans aged 18 years and older who are currently working or looking for work. The study examined employee expectations in a post-COVID workplace and found that more than half rank work-life balance and health and safety in their top three issues that they feel business leaders should be prioritising. The habits adopted during COVID-19 lockdown could be here to stay, with 81 percent wanting at least one COVID-19 practice adopted permanently in their day-to-day lives. Fewer than one in five are happy to return to how things were, with this figure even lower (7 percent) among workers aged 25-34. Key findings included wanting: • more flexibility in working…

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1 min
when doing good boosts health and wellbeing

“Prosocial behaviour is part of the shared culture of humankind, and our analysis shows that it also contributes to mental and physical health.” Hui and his colleagues performed a meta-analysis of 201 independent studies, comprising 198,213 total participants, that looked at the connection between prosocial behaviour and wellbeing. They found that random acts of kindness, such as helping an older neighbour carry groceries, were more strongly associated with overall wellbeing than formal prosocial behaviour, such as scheduled volunteering for a charity. The researchers also found a stronger link between kindness and what is known as eudaimonic wellbeing (which focuses on self-actualisation, as in realising one’s potential and finding meaning in life), than between kindness and hedonic wellbeing (which refers to happiness and positive feelings). The effects varied by age, according to…

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