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WildernessWilderness

Wilderness December 2018

Each issue of Wilderness takes its readers to the most beautiful areas in New Zealand, whether by foot, mountain bike, sea kayak, raft, pony or dream.

Country:
New Zealand
Language:
English
Publisher:
Lifestyle Publishing Ltd
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
happy christmas

CONSUMER SPECIAL INTEREST BEST MAGAZINE, EDITOR AND JOURNALIST OF THE YEAR - Magazine Publishers Association 2018 Magazine Awards AS I WRITE THIS, the sun is blazing down on a glorious November afternoon. My daughter is climbing the grapefruit tree in the garden.It’s a scene of utter bliss and contentment and I can expect more now that the summer school holidays are just around the corner. Holidays are a new concept to my daughter – everyday is a holiday. But from next year she’ll be at school and, if my own childhood is anything to go by, the six weeks she gets off from late December to early February will be among the happiest times of her childhood. Lifelong memories will be made.My memories centre around family camping holidays…

access_time5 min.
letter of the month

NOT MORE HELICOPTERS I DON’T REALLY want to have to wax cantankerous about what really is a laudable goal, getting more people out into the hills (‘Making mountains accessible’, November 2018), but are helicopters the answer to improving accessibility?If one can look past the massive nuisance they present as they whirr around the countryside, destroying what for many is one of the most fantastic things about the mountains – a soundscape absent of mechanised noise – they can hardly be seen as a reasonable form of access except to a privileged few. And that is the thing with helicopters; they are for the pleasure of the few to the detriment of the many.How can access that requires forking over hundreds, sometimes thousands, of dollars for a short…

access_time1 min.
your trips, your pix what did up you to get last weekend?

Amber Sinton and Emily Forne pack-(ice)-rafted on a tarn by Eldrig Peak in Fiordland Ffion Garden Mills, 4, walked the Lake Waikaremoana Great Walk Amalia and Francois Schoeman climbed to the St Arnaud Range tops, Nelson Lakes National Park Ethan Prattley walked the Travers-Sabine Circuit, Nelson Lakes National Park Aniwaniwa, Nova and Matariki Aiken-Cooper tramped to Field Hut, Tararua Forest Park Noah and Leon Schipper walked the Tongariro Alpine Crossing Amelia Barnes visited Double Hut, Hakatere Conservation Area Sam, Andy, Monty, Tessa and Suz Given (with Piper) tramped to Mystery Lake, Hakatere Conservation Park Brendan Jenke stayed in Soper Shelter, Kahurangi National Park Amber Stewart beat the broken arm blues, Whakaari Conservation Area GET YOUR PHOTO PUBLISHED HERE TO RECEIVE A TUB OF STORM LEATHER CREAM TO WATERPROOF, CONDITION…

access_time3 min.
are tramping tourists a liability?

Search and rescue figures have found Kiwis are more likely to be rescued than tourists on some popular tracks (CHRIS PRUDDEN) IT HAD A FAMILIARLY tragic plot. A tourist sets off ill-prepared on a challenging alpine walk. The weather deteriorates, and exposed to the elements in blizzard conditions, another international visitor doesn’t make it home from a New Zealand track.The death of Indian tourist Sateesh Babu Halehally-Chikkanna on the Tongariro Alpine Crossing in October has reinvigorated debate about how to ensure the safety of tourists exploring the backcountry.In the wake of the death, police and DOC released a statement urging the public to intervene and talk to tourists about their plans. “Talk to visitors who are in your shops, petrol stations or hotels,” senior constable Barry Shepherd said.…

access_time2 min.
call for greater access to high country farms

Public access to high country stations is back in the spotlight (PHILLIP CAPPER) AN ACADEMIC is calling for public debate on public access to Crown-owned farmland, saying the law governing access is ambiguous and is begging for further clarification.The Crown owns more than a million hectares of South Island high country, the bulk of which is leased to farmers through pastoral leases which can be perpetually renewed.University of Canterbury senior lecturer Dr Ann Brower said historically the law governing pastoral leases did not give farmers exclusive possession of the land, but only the right to graze it. This would imply the public has greater rights to access these high country stations. But she said decades of lobbying had created a perceived right of exclusive access.“Other parts of the…

access_time1 min.
hut revenue down after stormy year

Diggers Hut in the Ruahine Range is one backcountry hut that DOC won’t be getting any more revenue from (DANIEL MCINTYRE AND BEN PIGOT) REVENUE FROM backcountry huts has declined after the country was battered by storms earlier this year.DOC’s latest annual report shows revenue from backcountry huts has been flat since 2015/16 and declined by $33,000 over the past year to $2,062,000.DOC recreation, tourism and heritage director Gavin Walker said track closures from storms across the country affected revenue at a number of popular sites. Pinnacles Hut in Coromandel, the largest hut in the country, was closed for much of the year due to storm damage and revenue was down $52,000. A number of tracks in the Nelson region also suffered damage following cyclones earlier in the…

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