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category_outlined / Art & Architecture
AZUREAZURE

AZURE May 2018

Lively, fresh, forward-looking, but also socially relevant — this defines Azure, the leading design publication covering the expanding world of international contemporary architecture and design. Each issue delivers readers inspiring ideas and cutting-edge innovations, from state-of-the-art green building to the latest in furniture and home accessories from around the globe.

Country:
Canada
Language:
English
Publisher:
Azure Publishing Inc.
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8 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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we asked…

What up-and-coming product designer has caught your eye recently?SAMANTHA TSEWriter, “Michael Anastassiades: Playing by His Own Rules” (page 062)I’m a huge fan of Ini Archibong, the Switzerland-based designer. He’s rolling out the Below the Heavens collection (which includes the Eos Table, pictured) with British furniture brand Sé this year. I’ve seen images of the line and can’t wait to check out the real thing.What was the most memorable part of your assignment?DAVID DICK-AGNEWWriter, “Best Practices” (page 092)Walking through Ontario Place on a cold weekday afternoon, when the Toronto park was completely deserted. Eb Zeidler’s Cinesphere and the pavilions that hover over the water on pilotis still look contemporary after nearly 50 years. The solitude and sun made it the ideal time to interact with Polymétis’ Expanded Horizon.What product are you…

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first + foremost

Wink LightEver get the feeling you’re being watched? In the case of these whimsical, Spanish-made pendant lights, don’t sweat it: The effect is less Big Brother and more – as their name implies – playful wink. Shown earlier this year at Maison et Objet in Paris, the ceiling fixture is a collaboration between creative consultancy Masquespacio and design brand Houtique, both of Valencia. Ana Hernández, creative director at Masquespacio, says it celebrates the power of observation in the creation of good design. She clearly has the eye of a (neo) surrealist: The pink rayon fringe, suggestive of eyelashes, is Dalí with a postmodern twist. Measuring 15 centimetres long, it dangles from a stainless-steel semi-circle bathed in 18-karat gold and is detachable for cleaning. The thin black cable on which the…

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looking sharp

Rei KawakuboWhen critics refer to the architectural nature of Rei Kawakubo’s clothing, they’re usually referring to how structured it is. Recently, though, the Comme des Garçons founder took the distinction a step further by covering one of her exactingly constructed jackets – part of the label’s autumn 2018 men’s collection – with a line drawing by Milan-based architect and lecturer Stefan Davidovici. Given that his rendering was speculative, Davidovici never expected it to assume 3D form. But Kawakubo clearly saw its graphic potential, creating a tapestry of jagged angles and jutting planes out of his imaginary edifices – and giving new meaning to the notion of sharp dressing.comme-des-garcons.comTrapez TilesWhen it comes to tile shapes, squares and rectangles dominate, while other, more versatile contenders barely register. That’s changing. Witness Tonalite’s Trapez…

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5 things we learned from assemble

When Assemble won the Turner Prize in 2015, some artists carped about the U.K.’s top visual art award going to a group of architects. But the collective, best known for its low-cost, high-impact urban interventions, is hardly a typical practice. Started in 2011 by 18 twentysomethings with a range of backgrounds, it has been called “the future of progressive architecture” for its collaborative approach to its projects, the biggest of which – the Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art – is set to open soon. Recently, members James Binning and Maria Lisogorskaya spoke to Azure about the sustainability of Assemble’s model, suggesting lessons for firms big and small.1 Avoid hierarchical thinking.JB: At Assemble, people understand the tasks they’re directly responsible for on a daily basis. There’s also a collective responsibility for…

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wild at heart

Historically, parks in the Russian capital have been of the formal, symmetrical variety. To say that Zaryadye Park, just steps from Red Square on the north side of the Moscow River, deviates from tradition would be an understatement. A dynamic interweaving of natural elements that evoke Russia’s varied topography with built forms including amphitheatres, a restaurant and a dramatic, boomerang-shaped viewing deck, the 14-hectare site defies easy labelling, although the designers behind it – an international consortium led by Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R) of New York – describe the result as “wild urbanism.” The wildness comes in the form of gradually descending terraces that recreate four of Russia’s distinctive landscapes: steppe, tundra, forest and wetland. These areas are connected by a meandering network of stone paving that extends like…

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feat of clay

Slender metal legs hold up the sink unit constructed around a pillar in the middle of the store.At night, the space emits a soft pink glow.Located off King’s Road in London’s affluent Chelsea district, Duke of York Square was always going to attract top retailers. To entice prospective tenants even more, the developers who repurposed the Georgian-era plaza in the early 2000s offered a range of real estate options, from listed historic buildings to a former school gym with a vaulted ceiling and original arched windows.Aesop, however, wanted more. When it set its sights on the square, the boutique Australian skin-care brand, known for its customized, experiential interiors, decided to push the envelope. To create what is now its largest shop in Great Britain, Aesop turned to Snøhetta, the Norwegian…

RECENT ISSUES

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