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BackyardBackyard

Backyard

Issue #17.3 2019

Welcome to the new-look Backyard, the magazine for those who don’t just dream of an amazing garden, they want to get out there and make it happen. If the backyard is where you gather with family and friends; if you want to do more in your backyard, be that build a garden bed or lay some paving; and if you want to get your kids involved too, Backyard is what you need. Backyard covers a wide range of topics for the consumer who is doing a complete makeover. Including but not limited to Planning a Garden, Makeover Ideas, Design Advice, Water Wise Gardening, Outdoor Lighting, Pool Design, Outdoor Furniture, Garden Art, Shade Solutions and Paving Options. Purchase includes the Digital Edition and News Service. Please stay in touch via our Facebook Page.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Universal Wellbeing PTY Limited
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
editor’s note

Spring has sprung and we’re all venturing outside that little bit more as the daylight lasts longer and the thermometer creeps higher and higher. Perfect timing, then, for a recap of this year’s Chelsea Flower Show in the UK, with its fantastic array of choice plots covering such enticing themes as Beyond the Screen (a look at the way our online and offline lives interconnect) and the Monsters Garden, acknowledging the arduous journey some families have as they try to navigate the challenges of daily life. As you’re probably examining your outdoor spaces with a critical eye right now, we’ve thoughtfully provided some truly inspiring styles in our Snapshot section, while over in Backyard Revolution we’re introduced to the genuinely fascinating — if slightly bewildering — subject of biotecture with keen…

access_time1 min.
backyard

Editor Angela Young Email: ayoung@umco.com.au Writers Cassie Haywood, Karen Booth, Alice Griffin, Cassandra Elliott, Donnay Torr Sub-Editor Michelle Segal Designer Michaela Primiano Sales Manager Miriam Keen Advertising Art Director Martha Rubazewicz Advertising Production Alex Dalland Chairman/CEO Prema Perera Publisher Janice Williams Chief Financial Officer Vicky Mahadeva Associate Publisher Emma Perera Finance & Administration Manager James Perera Circulation Business Development Manager Mark McTaggart Creative Director Kate Podger Marketing & Acquisitions Manager Chelsea Peters…

access_time4 min.
don't miss a beat

QUEENSLAND AWARD WINNERS June saw the winners of the 2019 Queensland Landscape Architecture Awards announced by the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects (AILA). Recognising 20 winners across 12 categories, including five Awards of Excellence and four Regional Achievement Awards, the awards highlighted projects that celebrated environmental and historic landmark preservation, the restoration of neglected urban nodes and spaces that bring communities together. AILA Queensland president David Uhlmann said: “This year we received 62 award submissions from an impressive range of cities and towns, which goes to show the number of high-calibre landscape architecture projects on our doorstep.” Winner of the Landscape Architecture Award in the Gardens category was Lat27’s Riverlight, Hamilton Reach (pictured left). “Riverlight responded uniquely to the landscape surrounding a private residential tower, creating a subtle transition between public and private…

access_time6 min.
the makers

NATURE’S BOUNTY There’s no better place to see where garden design is heading, or to garner some quirky, fun and out-of-the-box ideas for your own backyard, than a garden show. The doyenne of the show garden circuit is the Chelsea Flower Show, held each May in London. Like the fashion you see on the runways of Milan or Paris, some designs are there to simply showcase the creativity of the designers, but most provide ideas — for planting, decor, outdoor entertaining spaces, the use of reclaimed materials and more — that you can easily adapt to the home garden. This year, the emphasis was on naturalistic planting and reconnecting with nature, and this was especially evident in the Back to Nature Garden (shown here). Co-designed by The Duchess of Cambridge and…

access_time5 min.
the mulberry treehouse

Zenko and Janine Vukelic were the first people in Australia to experiment with growing their own home from mulberry trees. Biotecture isn’t a new concept — it’s common practice in north-east India, where living bridges grown from aerial roots of rubber trees have been supporting river crossings for hundreds of years, becoming stronger and larger with time. Some tree species grow by the natural process of inosculation. This is when the branches and roots grow into each other, becoming one (biologically similar to grafting). Another example is a strangler fig naturally forming a net-like weave by growing into itself. This behaviour can be encouraged by a process called pleaching: manually interlacing the branches of inosculating tree species. A friend of Zenko and Janine, Chris Piper, co-founder of Queensland-based Carbon Capture Construction, designs and…

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zenko’s top tips

1 The life in your garden soil is what feeds the plants, so feed the microbes with compost and manure and keep up the moisture content. 2 Plant an abundance of fruit trees to feed the visiting hungry wildlife and increase biodiversity in your garden. 3 If you have grass, brush-cut around newly planted trees for the first few years; the grass and other mulch will feed the trees and help retain moisture around them. 4 Use a weed mat to prevent persistent grass from getting into your raised garden beds. 5 When growing cuttings, ensure you don’t overwater them as they’ll rot. The key is to find the right moisture balance.…

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