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Australian HunterAustralian Hunter

Australian Hunter Edition 65

Australian Hunter aims to create a better environment and community understanding of all forms of hunting, whether for animal management, trophies or food for the family table. The magazine features articles and advice on hunting all manner of game from rabbits, foxes and goats to pigs, deer, buffaloes and more. Also featured are product reviews by experienced hunters and outdoor enthusiasts on firearms, optics, knives and related gear for the field, as well as practical advice for tracking, hunting, butchering and cooking game.

Pays:
Australia
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Sporting Shooters' Association of Australia
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access_time2 min.
from the editor

Australian Hunter 65 hits the midway mark of the year and the second edition for 2018 is absolutely brimming from cover to cover, featuring action-packed hunting tales, firearm, ammo, edgeware and product reviews, along with some wise words from seasoned hunters.Around the globe, Sam Garro faces pesky mosquitoes in wet conditions while hunting ducks and boars in NSW. Chris Redlich ventures across the Tasman and treks treacherous terrain while buck hunting in New Zealand’s Alps. Ben Unten outfoxes foxes and happily displays the proof. Blake Hjorth quickly asks three questions before finding himself hunting in the dry lands of southern Africa and Ross Preston turns his attention to Australia’s notorious native animal killer - the feral cat.Firearms and ammo are expertly covered, as Con Kapralos scopes out the Franchi Horizon…

access_time11 min.
three questions pave the way to   africa

Whereabouts? When? Is there a spare spot? With those three questions, I was suddenly on my way to Africa. The answers to those questions were: Namibia, in about eight months and yes, there’s a place available if you want to come too.Wow! I was going to the Dark Continent on a plains game hunting trip. How did that happen? I had never really thought that one day I’d be hunting in Africa, but as it transpired, my brother Reid and a couple of his mates had chosen an outfitter, booked their flights and were raring to go. I jumped at the chance to join the gang. We would be hunting with Harald and Liezel Jacobsz of Osombahe-Nord Hunting Safaris, in central Namibia, for seven days.I was going to be taking…

access_time10 min.
chamois buck   in the new zealand rut

With high expectations, I was being rushed away from Christchurch Airport southbound by a shuttle driver who moments earlier had been waiting for me at the bottom of an escalator holding up a sign with my name on it. It was a long time in the making but I was about to commence a trip of a lifetime and my first overseas hunt.Years ago, back in 2008, my wife and I spent a two-week driving holiday in New Zealand. We instantly fell in love with the place and the scenery was breathtaking. At the time, I didn’t know much about hunting in that country or the game roaming the mountains. It was at the airport that I picked up a New Zealand hunting magazine and began reading about mountain-dwelling animals…

access_time9 min.
pigs, mossies and   marauding ducks

Sam Garro with a tally of ducks coming in to feed on the rice.Sam Garro points to the water level of two to three weeks earlier on the large gum.Our scheduled pig hunt in November on the NSW property coincided with a cooler break in the weather compared to the oppressive 40C-degree temperatures we had been experiencing. And the property owner’s late aerial rice sewing, a task normally performed in August/September each year had been delayed due to the heavy rains, swollen creeks and general flooding. All this made it impossible for the owner to reach the rice paddocks to attend to the maintenance of the levies and floodgates.The flooding had also prevented us from moving onto the property earlier, when conditions were more favourable with good feed still about.…

access_time10 min.
curiosity   killed the feral cat

Ross with his Sako Varmint .22-250 and a feral tomcat.As recreational hunters, my son Rob and I focus heavily on wild dogs. Our success on properties in the Brisbane Valley area of South East Queensland has led to requests for help from other property owners who have felt the pain and experienced the grief of losing valued breeding stock and calves to these cruel canines.As many fellow hunters will be aware, wild dogs are difficult to find and must always be taken with the first clean shot because, apart from the ethical implications, you are unlikely to gain a second shot at the same dog, ever.We are always keen to learn more, especially about the technology that may help us to do better, and at the past SSAA SHOT Expo…

access_time4 min.
a good spot for stags

The spring feed gully where deer go to water.Scenery on the way to the hunting spot.A lot of people have commented to me over the years that I must be a lucky hunter. Well, no. I don’t always take something - a lot of the time I just go out into the bush and look, take photos and enjoy the wildlife and leave them alone. I remember a while back when I went out for four roars in a row and never shot a stag, or even a doe for that matter. I never saw a stag carrying a trophy set of antlers better than anything I had hanging on my wall at home, so I didn’t feel the need to shoot one.Nowadays, I take more deer as meat animals…

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