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BBC Gardeners' WorldBBC Gardeners' World

BBC Gardeners' World

November 2019

Gardeners' World Magazine is the authoritative voice in gardening, the clear market-leader since it launched in 1991. The award-winning editorial includes topical, practical advice in the readers' favourite 'what to do now' section, and regular contributions and features from the top names in BBC gardening. Packed with fresh ideas and clear advice - the innovative approach offers creative, practical and problem-solving solutions to all keen gardeners.

Pays:
United Kingdom
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Immediate Media Company London Limited
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12 Numéros

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discover more from gardeners’ world magazine

Our award-winning app Keep up to date while on the move with our digital edition, made for iPhone and iPad. Get extra content plus videos from Monty and the team, and access to our subscriber-only, online Secret Garden. Pay from £3.49 an issue in iTunes or go to bit.ly/GW-digital Learn with experts Take your passion for gardening deeper with our new video training courses on Pruning and Cut Flowers, presented by Associate Editor David Hurrion. Priced from £29, see more at learningwith experts.com and page 88. Savvy shopping Buying gardening tools is a big investment, so to help you choose the best kit, we’ve grown our online reviews and video guides. Find out more at gardeners world.com/reviews and see page 75. Have your say! The judges have picked their Gardens of the Year winners – so it’s…

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welcome

The sheer joy of creating a garden, and sharing it with friends and family, came through loud and clear from the hundreds of entries to this year’s Gardens of the Year competition. And we were touched by the many stories of how gardens are helping to heal and to bring us together – transforming spaces and creating life from, at times, the most unpromising start. With so much creativity on display, it wasn’t easy to reach our shortlist but, thanks to our brilliant and insightful judging panel, we are delighted to unveil this year’s top gardens from p59, packed with dozens of design ideas to steal. The value of greening up our cities is a theme – and if you’re unsure how to tackle an awkward space, or have a blank…

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we love november for glowing hues and frosty mornings

STAR OF THE MONTH Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus) I have always loved cardoons for their massive leaves and towering flower stalks – they’re a real statement plant for a large border or standing on their own in a front garden. The thistle-like flowers rise to 3m tall and seem to provide enough nectar for every bee within shouting distance. By this time of year the colour has gone, but this plant still stands like an Assyrian temple worn down by time and weather, battered but unbowed. This one is accompanied into decay by a handsome smoke bush (Cotinus coggygria), whose once deep purple leaves are now fading to rust. Happy with every aspect except a north-facing border. Flower spikes need a strong stake to stop them falling under their own weight. Height x Spread…

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expert’s choice euonymus

Euonymus is one of those invaluable shrubs that we find in almost every garden – but that, on the whole, no one really gets very excited about. But perhaps we should. These are tough, varied and, in a surprising variety of ways, very attractive shrubs, in two distinct groups. The evergreens, mainly Euonymus fortunei and E. japonicus, are simply indispensable. These are the ones we see so often. Always well behaved and available in groundcover, bushy or quietly climbing forms, they are small garden essentials for their variegated foliage and pink winter tints. Deciduous varieties, especially E. alatus and E. europaeus, are rather different. Maturing to a noticeably larger size, their foliage is also their main asset. But in this case it’s the autumn leaves that are so special – rich, vivid…

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the full monty

As a rule I actively avoid trends, fads and fashions. I am happy to be out of kilter with the way of the world and focus on my own thing. But on one thing I am more than happy to be firmly on message, and that is the burgeoning appreciation of wildflowers, and in particular wildflower meadows. Wildflower meadows have increasingly been made in gardens over the past quarter of a century, but always with caveats. The problem was usually one of misunderstanding what a meadow actually is and how it works and also just what a thug grass can be. You would hear of someone making a ‘meadow’ simply by not cutting their lawn or by scattering wildflower seed and then expecting an annual cornucopia to ensue. Even those who…

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have your say

All wrapped up Well done BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine! I smiled instantly when I saw my October issue arrive in a paper envelope, thinking how good to cut down on plastic. I also appreciate the fact that subscribers are first to see the latest issue of the magazine before it hits the shelves – and even the cover is kept secret by the envelope! Joanne Stringer, via the BBC Gardeners’ World Facebook group Absolutely delighted that you are now posting out Gardeners’ World Magazine in a paper wrapper instead of a plastic one. It is vital that the use of plastic is urgently addressed worldwide, so thank you. Our wonderful planet is being abused in many ways. I am in my eighties but recognise that much needs to change in all our lifestyles…

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