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BBC Gardeners' WorldBBC Gardeners' World

BBC Gardeners' World June 2019

Gardeners' World Magazine is the authoritative voice in gardening, the clear market-leader since it launched in 1991. The award-winning editorial includes topical, practical advice in the readers' favourite 'what to do now' section, and regular contributions and features from the top names in BBC gardening. Packed with fresh ideas and clear advice - the innovative approach offers creative, practical and problem-solving solutions to all keen gardeners.

Pays:
United Kingdom
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Immediate Media Company London Limited
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12 Numéros

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discover more

Award-winning app Keep up to date while on the move with our digital edition, made for iPhone and iPad. You’ll find extra content plus videos from Monty and the team, and access to the subscriber-only Secret Garden area of our website. Pay from just £3.49 per issue. Go to bit.ly/GW-digital Growing with nature Explore more eco-savvy ways to garden, through our extra online content this month. Discover extra projects and videos, at gardeners world.com/ growing-with-nature Some like it hot! We launch in this issue our June collection of container plants, chosen by magazine editors for readers who love pots with impact. Find out more about the range by turning to p76. Passport to great gardens If you missed our May issue, featuring the legendary 2 for 1 Gardens Entry Card & Guide, worry not! You can still…

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welcome

Does anything signal summer more than the drowsy thrum of a bee foraging through your borders or the skittish flutter of a butterfly? Our gardens can be a pleasure ground for wildlife, as well as us, if we provide them with the right ingredients – and June is the perfect month to lay out a summer feast. But of course it’s not as easy as that. Our islands’ 23 million gardens are part of a bigger picture – national and global – that paints the loss of vital species, of weather patterns disrupted, wasted natural resources and habitats, not to mention plastic... So how should gardeners respond? To address this, we’re taking on the really chewy issue of how we garden now and in the future, in our Growing with Nature special,…

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we love june for summer’s long-awaited arrival

STAR OF THE MONTH Lupinus ‘Persian Slipper’ My grandmother (and probably yours as well) always had lupins in her garden, but I must confess that my favourite ones are those that have magically (and possibly mystically) appeared on the embankments of motorways up and down the country. I like to think that some mischievous gardener wound down the window and flung out a handful of seeds as they beetled past at great speed. However, if you want a more leisurely way of viewing your lupins, then we have a pretty fabulous example, glittering in grasses, frolicking with fennel and soaring over salvias. Slightly shorter than many lupins. Watch out for aphids. Cut back after flowering to get a second flush of flowers. Height x Spread 75cm x 60cm LET THE GOOD SEED FLY If ever…

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expert’s choice hardy geraniums

Hardy geraniums are one of Britain’s favourite hardy perennials. There’s been a huge increase in the varieties available and the RHS now lists nearly 1,500. Nearly 50 have received the prestigious RHS Award of Garden Merit and exciting new hybrids appear every year. But what makes them so popular? First, there’s the long flowering season, with some blooms opening from May into autumn – invaluable in a small garden. Hardy geraniums are also easy to grow, many thrive in both sun and shade, and most are easy to propagate by division. They’re tough, they’re mostly manageable in size, and some have lovely foliage as well as attractive flowers. Generally, it’s a very positive story. Perhaps the only factor in the balance is that the flower colour is limited: most come in pinks,…

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the full monty

At the beginning of April I made a brief trip to Keukenhof Gardens in Holland. I was the guest of a travel company and sang for my supper by giving a talk about tulips to others on the trip. They were surprised when I announced that this was my first trip to Keukenhof. For those unfamiliar with it, Keukenhof is a garden in the small town of Lisse, some 30 miles south west of Amsterdam, famous for its spring display of bulbs. I am underselling it. It is one of the most extraordinary, huge and stupendous floral performances in the world. For about eight weeks in April and May, spring bulbs and, above all, tulips, flower in astonishing abundance across its 79 acres. It opens to the public for just eight…

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the brexit effect

In response to the article on Brexit (Brexit: The Impact for Gardeners, May issue), do stop spreading gloom and doom. There’s nothing like fresh fruit and veg from your own garden, allotment or field. You mention that pot plants will just be sitting in lorries, but I’m sure they could be watered. I feel optimistic about Brexit, and we will benefit from not buying rubbish from EU countries that doesn’t last five minutes anyway. Margaret Bevan, by email Brexit will be good for gardens, gardeners and growers. We will have better control of our imports – to avoid nasties such as ash dieback disease; to reduce competition from cheap foreign imports and give our growers a better chance, so gaps will be filled with home-grown plants rather than exotica. Shelagh Smith, by email I…

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